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BrewSkey Gadget Transforms Bottled Beer into Chelada

BrewSkey Gadget Transforms Bottled Beer into Chelada



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If you're still reeling from the news that MillerCoors has frozen out its Miller Chill brand, then you will be happy to learn a San Antonio-based company, The BrewsKey, has launched a product to turn your beer into a Chelada. Promising to "Unlock The Flavor of Your Beer," it looks like a great stocking stuffer this holiday season.
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Brand-Name Recipes

Welcome. You just found copycat recipes for all of your favorite famous foods! Bestselling author and TV host Todd Wilbur shows you how to duplicate the taste of iconic dishes and treats at home. Todd's recipes are easy to follow and fun to make. Search for recipes by brand name here. New recipes added every week.

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This recipe makes a little more of the popular mixer than you'll get in the 34-ounce plastic bottles at the store. So now when you crave a frosty margarita or snappy whiskey sour and don't have any sweet-and-sour mix on hand, you can make a quick batch from scratch. Mix drinks with this stuff as you would the real sweet-and-sour mix in your favorite cocktails and party libations.

Louisiana chef Paul Prudhomme, America's number one Dom DeLuise look-a-like, hit it big in supermarkets with his magical brand of Cajun spice blends. Chef Paul developed his seasonings after years of making little batches and passing them out to customers in the restaurants where he worked. Now his Magic Seasoning Blends come in several varieties and are produced in a whopping 30,000-square-foot plant by 38 employees. Fortunately, it'll take only one of you in a small kitchen to make a clone of one of the most popular versions of the blend. Use it when you barbecue, roast, grill, or saute your favorite chicken, turkey, duck, or Cornish game hens.

Click here for more famous seasoning and spice blend clone recipes.

Put on a big red smile. Now you can make your own version of the popular convenience store slush, complete with brain freeze. You must have a blender to make this clone of 7-Eleven's Slurpee, and enough room to stick that blender into your freezer to get it nice and thick. This recipe gets close to the original with Kool-Aid mix and a little help from cherry extract, but you can make this drink with any flavor Kool-Aid mix (if you decide to make some variations, don't worry about adding extract). This recipe makes enough to fill one of those giant-size 32-ounce cups you find at the convenience store. Now I should hack the spoon-straws.

In 1995 when I cloned Snapple iced teas in More Top Secret Recipes, I picked several varieties of the tea and used either concentrated juices or extracts for the fruity essence. Since that time, Snapple was sold to Quaker and the less popular flavors were retired to the land of the dead foods. But a clone for one of the most popular flavors of ice tea eluded me back then, since there was no common extract or juice concentrate to turn to for that flavor. Bummer too, since Snapple's raspberry iced tea is a top seller. Today, thanks to the popularity of flavored coffee drinks, flavored syrups can be found in supermarkets. The most common brand is Torani. Get some of the raspberry flavor and you can clone this secret recipe for a fraction of the cost of the real thing.

Kellogg's reacted to spectacular sales of its Rice Krispies Treats with two new varieties of the popular and addictive snack, and TSR got on the case. Just about everyone has tasted the original Rice Krispies Treats. The homemade version is the first assignment in Cooking 101, after learning how to boil water. And the Kellogg's store-bought packaged version has been available for several years now. This variety, however, puts that whole Reese's "You got your peanut butter in my chocolate" thing to work. But don't be fooled by that dark "chocolatey" coating on top. It's not actually chocolate, but rather a melt-resistant custom blend of cocoa and, uh, stuff, that tastes like chocolate but adds longer shelf-life. In the hack lab we don't use such ingredients. Instead we'll melt some real chocolate in the microwave to top our cinch of a crispy clone. Much better.

If you love the taste of Sunny D but wish it were made with more than just 5 percent real fruit juice, this is the Sunny Delight recipe for you. Rustle up some frozen juice concentrates and let them thaw out before measuring. Since tangerine juice concentrate is tough to find on its own, I designed the Sunny Delight orange juice recipe to use the orange/tangerine blend concentrate from Minute Maid.

Bailey's uses a special process to combine two otherwise incompatible ingredients: cream and whiskey. This secret technique keeps the cream from clumping and separating from the whiskey, and allows the liqueur to go for two years unrefrigerated without spoiling. But we won't need to tap into any secret preparation techniques for our clone here since well be storing the liqueur in the refrigerator. We will, however, replace cream with canned evaporated milk. This gives us a properly sweetened finished product with the taste and texture of the deliciously famous Irish cream. Here now is an improved version of the Bailey's clone recipe that appears in More Top Secret Recipes. This version has fewer ingredients, is easier to make, and tastes amazing.

Make more fun copycat cocktails and liqueurs with my recipes here.

I was having trouble getting the flavors just right for Lipton's bottled diet green tea, which has become such a big seller. Real lime juice wasn't cutting it, nor were any of the extracts or oils I tried. Then, one day, I stumbled onto a new product called True Lime. It's a crystallized lime substitute that's made with lime juice and lime oil, and it comes in 2.85-ounce bottles or in boxes of 40 packets. It can be found in the baking aisle of your local supermarket, and it can be used for cooking wherever lime juice is required, or you can dissolve it in beverages. Had I found my secret ingredient? After some experimenting, I discovered that the citric acid in True Lime adds just the right amount of acidic tang that we need for a clone that tastes like the original product (which also contains citric acid). Success! To make your own version of this popular bottled green tea, simply pour some boiling water over a couple green tea bags, add the other ingredients listed below, and you'll soon have a home-brewed clone of Lipton's hit drink. Calories not included.

If you've never had a Chelada, the idea of mixing beer with Clamato juice may make your stomach turn. This odd combination of beverages has origins in Mexico that date back to the 1940s, when beer was mixed with lime, salt, and hot sauce or salsa. In early 2008, Anheuser-Busch (Budweiser) and Cadbury-Schweppes (Clamato) teamed up to produce the first canned Chelada beverage, which they dubbed "The Red One," and after a successful launch in select western states, the product is now exploding across the country. Many swear by the drink as a remarkable hangover cure, and after some extensive personal experimentation, I must concur.

Click here for more famous drink recipes.

It was in the 1960s that deliveryman Vinnie Gruppuso got hooked on the pudding being made at one of the delis in Brooklyn where he delivered bread. Vinnie struck up a deal with that deli—called Cozy Shack—to sell the pudding to other customers on his route, and the product soon outsold his other delivery items. Eventually Vinnie scrapped up enough money to purchase the deli's pudding operation, he changed the "C" in the name to a "K," and today Kozy Shack is the number one manufacturer of rice pudding in North America. As with the original secret formula, six basic ingredients are all that go into this clone of the company's top-seller. But you'll also need a cooking thermometer and a large pot with at least a 10-inch diameter. A pot this wide helps the mixture to reduce faster. Keep your eye on the temperature and be sure to stir the pudding often. When the mixture begins to thicken, pop the pudding into your fridge for several hours where it will continue to thicken to the creamy consistency of the real thing as it cools.

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Brand-Name Recipes

Welcome. You just found copycat recipes for all of your favorite famous foods! Bestselling author and TV host Todd Wilbur shows you how to duplicate the taste of iconic dishes and treats at home. Todd's recipes are easy to follow and fun to make. Search for recipes by brand name here. New recipes added every week.

  • 1
  • .
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9
  • 10
  • 11
  • 12
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  • .
  • 21

This recipe makes a little more of the popular mixer than you'll get in the 34-ounce plastic bottles at the store. So now when you crave a frosty margarita or snappy whiskey sour and don't have any sweet-and-sour mix on hand, you can make a quick batch from scratch. Mix drinks with this stuff as you would the real sweet-and-sour mix in your favorite cocktails and party libations.

Louisiana chef Paul Prudhomme, America's number one Dom DeLuise look-a-like, hit it big in supermarkets with his magical brand of Cajun spice blends. Chef Paul developed his seasonings after years of making little batches and passing them out to customers in the restaurants where he worked. Now his Magic Seasoning Blends come in several varieties and are produced in a whopping 30,000-square-foot plant by 38 employees. Fortunately, it'll take only one of you in a small kitchen to make a clone of one of the most popular versions of the blend. Use it when you barbecue, roast, grill, or saute your favorite chicken, turkey, duck, or Cornish game hens.

Click here for more famous seasoning and spice blend clone recipes.

Put on a big red smile. Now you can make your own version of the popular convenience store slush, complete with brain freeze. You must have a blender to make this clone of 7-Eleven's Slurpee, and enough room to stick that blender into your freezer to get it nice and thick. This recipe gets close to the original with Kool-Aid mix and a little help from cherry extract, but you can make this drink with any flavor Kool-Aid mix (if you decide to make some variations, don't worry about adding extract). This recipe makes enough to fill one of those giant-size 32-ounce cups you find at the convenience store. Now I should hack the spoon-straws.

In 1995 when I cloned Snapple iced teas in More Top Secret Recipes, I picked several varieties of the tea and used either concentrated juices or extracts for the fruity essence. Since that time, Snapple was sold to Quaker and the less popular flavors were retired to the land of the dead foods. But a clone for one of the most popular flavors of ice tea eluded me back then, since there was no common extract or juice concentrate to turn to for that flavor. Bummer too, since Snapple's raspberry iced tea is a top seller. Today, thanks to the popularity of flavored coffee drinks, flavored syrups can be found in supermarkets. The most common brand is Torani. Get some of the raspberry flavor and you can clone this secret recipe for a fraction of the cost of the real thing.

Kellogg's reacted to spectacular sales of its Rice Krispies Treats with two new varieties of the popular and addictive snack, and TSR got on the case. Just about everyone has tasted the original Rice Krispies Treats. The homemade version is the first assignment in Cooking 101, after learning how to boil water. And the Kellogg's store-bought packaged version has been available for several years now. This variety, however, puts that whole Reese's "You got your peanut butter in my chocolate" thing to work. But don't be fooled by that dark "chocolatey" coating on top. It's not actually chocolate, but rather a melt-resistant custom blend of cocoa and, uh, stuff, that tastes like chocolate but adds longer shelf-life. In the hack lab we don't use such ingredients. Instead we'll melt some real chocolate in the microwave to top our cinch of a crispy clone. Much better.

If you love the taste of Sunny D but wish it were made with more than just 5 percent real fruit juice, this is the Sunny Delight recipe for you. Rustle up some frozen juice concentrates and let them thaw out before measuring. Since tangerine juice concentrate is tough to find on its own, I designed the Sunny Delight orange juice recipe to use the orange/tangerine blend concentrate from Minute Maid.

Bailey's uses a special process to combine two otherwise incompatible ingredients: cream and whiskey. This secret technique keeps the cream from clumping and separating from the whiskey, and allows the liqueur to go for two years unrefrigerated without spoiling. But we won't need to tap into any secret preparation techniques for our clone here since well be storing the liqueur in the refrigerator. We will, however, replace cream with canned evaporated milk. This gives us a properly sweetened finished product with the taste and texture of the deliciously famous Irish cream. Here now is an improved version of the Bailey's clone recipe that appears in More Top Secret Recipes. This version has fewer ingredients, is easier to make, and tastes amazing.

Make more fun copycat cocktails and liqueurs with my recipes here.

I was having trouble getting the flavors just right for Lipton's bottled diet green tea, which has become such a big seller. Real lime juice wasn't cutting it, nor were any of the extracts or oils I tried. Then, one day, I stumbled onto a new product called True Lime. It's a crystallized lime substitute that's made with lime juice and lime oil, and it comes in 2.85-ounce bottles or in boxes of 40 packets. It can be found in the baking aisle of your local supermarket, and it can be used for cooking wherever lime juice is required, or you can dissolve it in beverages. Had I found my secret ingredient? After some experimenting, I discovered that the citric acid in True Lime adds just the right amount of acidic tang that we need for a clone that tastes like the original product (which also contains citric acid). Success! To make your own version of this popular bottled green tea, simply pour some boiling water over a couple green tea bags, add the other ingredients listed below, and you'll soon have a home-brewed clone of Lipton's hit drink. Calories not included.

If you've never had a Chelada, the idea of mixing beer with Clamato juice may make your stomach turn. This odd combination of beverages has origins in Mexico that date back to the 1940s, when beer was mixed with lime, salt, and hot sauce or salsa. In early 2008, Anheuser-Busch (Budweiser) and Cadbury-Schweppes (Clamato) teamed up to produce the first canned Chelada beverage, which they dubbed "The Red One," and after a successful launch in select western states, the product is now exploding across the country. Many swear by the drink as a remarkable hangover cure, and after some extensive personal experimentation, I must concur.

Click here for more famous drink recipes.

It was in the 1960s that deliveryman Vinnie Gruppuso got hooked on the pudding being made at one of the delis in Brooklyn where he delivered bread. Vinnie struck up a deal with that deli—called Cozy Shack—to sell the pudding to other customers on his route, and the product soon outsold his other delivery items. Eventually Vinnie scrapped up enough money to purchase the deli's pudding operation, he changed the "C" in the name to a "K," and today Kozy Shack is the number one manufacturer of rice pudding in North America. As with the original secret formula, six basic ingredients are all that go into this clone of the company's top-seller. But you'll also need a cooking thermometer and a large pot with at least a 10-inch diameter. A pot this wide helps the mixture to reduce faster. Keep your eye on the temperature and be sure to stir the pudding often. When the mixture begins to thicken, pop the pudding into your fridge for several hours where it will continue to thicken to the creamy consistency of the real thing as it cools.

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Brand-Name Recipes

Welcome. You just found copycat recipes for all of your favorite famous foods! Bestselling author and TV host Todd Wilbur shows you how to duplicate the taste of iconic dishes and treats at home. Todd's recipes are easy to follow and fun to make. Search for recipes by brand name here. New recipes added every week.

  • 1
  • .
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9
  • 10
  • 11
  • 12
  • 13
  • 14
  • .
  • 21

This recipe makes a little more of the popular mixer than you'll get in the 34-ounce plastic bottles at the store. So now when you crave a frosty margarita or snappy whiskey sour and don't have any sweet-and-sour mix on hand, you can make a quick batch from scratch. Mix drinks with this stuff as you would the real sweet-and-sour mix in your favorite cocktails and party libations.

Louisiana chef Paul Prudhomme, America's number one Dom DeLuise look-a-like, hit it big in supermarkets with his magical brand of Cajun spice blends. Chef Paul developed his seasonings after years of making little batches and passing them out to customers in the restaurants where he worked. Now his Magic Seasoning Blends come in several varieties and are produced in a whopping 30,000-square-foot plant by 38 employees. Fortunately, it'll take only one of you in a small kitchen to make a clone of one of the most popular versions of the blend. Use it when you barbecue, roast, grill, or saute your favorite chicken, turkey, duck, or Cornish game hens.

Click here for more famous seasoning and spice blend clone recipes.

Put on a big red smile. Now you can make your own version of the popular convenience store slush, complete with brain freeze. You must have a blender to make this clone of 7-Eleven's Slurpee, and enough room to stick that blender into your freezer to get it nice and thick. This recipe gets close to the original with Kool-Aid mix and a little help from cherry extract, but you can make this drink with any flavor Kool-Aid mix (if you decide to make some variations, don't worry about adding extract). This recipe makes enough to fill one of those giant-size 32-ounce cups you find at the convenience store. Now I should hack the spoon-straws.

In 1995 when I cloned Snapple iced teas in More Top Secret Recipes, I picked several varieties of the tea and used either concentrated juices or extracts for the fruity essence. Since that time, Snapple was sold to Quaker and the less popular flavors were retired to the land of the dead foods. But a clone for one of the most popular flavors of ice tea eluded me back then, since there was no common extract or juice concentrate to turn to for that flavor. Bummer too, since Snapple's raspberry iced tea is a top seller. Today, thanks to the popularity of flavored coffee drinks, flavored syrups can be found in supermarkets. The most common brand is Torani. Get some of the raspberry flavor and you can clone this secret recipe for a fraction of the cost of the real thing.

Kellogg's reacted to spectacular sales of its Rice Krispies Treats with two new varieties of the popular and addictive snack, and TSR got on the case. Just about everyone has tasted the original Rice Krispies Treats. The homemade version is the first assignment in Cooking 101, after learning how to boil water. And the Kellogg's store-bought packaged version has been available for several years now. This variety, however, puts that whole Reese's "You got your peanut butter in my chocolate" thing to work. But don't be fooled by that dark "chocolatey" coating on top. It's not actually chocolate, but rather a melt-resistant custom blend of cocoa and, uh, stuff, that tastes like chocolate but adds longer shelf-life. In the hack lab we don't use such ingredients. Instead we'll melt some real chocolate in the microwave to top our cinch of a crispy clone. Much better.

If you love the taste of Sunny D but wish it were made with more than just 5 percent real fruit juice, this is the Sunny Delight recipe for you. Rustle up some frozen juice concentrates and let them thaw out before measuring. Since tangerine juice concentrate is tough to find on its own, I designed the Sunny Delight orange juice recipe to use the orange/tangerine blend concentrate from Minute Maid.

Bailey's uses a special process to combine two otherwise incompatible ingredients: cream and whiskey. This secret technique keeps the cream from clumping and separating from the whiskey, and allows the liqueur to go for two years unrefrigerated without spoiling. But we won't need to tap into any secret preparation techniques for our clone here since well be storing the liqueur in the refrigerator. We will, however, replace cream with canned evaporated milk. This gives us a properly sweetened finished product with the taste and texture of the deliciously famous Irish cream. Here now is an improved version of the Bailey's clone recipe that appears in More Top Secret Recipes. This version has fewer ingredients, is easier to make, and tastes amazing.

Make more fun copycat cocktails and liqueurs with my recipes here.

I was having trouble getting the flavors just right for Lipton's bottled diet green tea, which has become such a big seller. Real lime juice wasn't cutting it, nor were any of the extracts or oils I tried. Then, one day, I stumbled onto a new product called True Lime. It's a crystallized lime substitute that's made with lime juice and lime oil, and it comes in 2.85-ounce bottles or in boxes of 40 packets. It can be found in the baking aisle of your local supermarket, and it can be used for cooking wherever lime juice is required, or you can dissolve it in beverages. Had I found my secret ingredient? After some experimenting, I discovered that the citric acid in True Lime adds just the right amount of acidic tang that we need for a clone that tastes like the original product (which also contains citric acid). Success! To make your own version of this popular bottled green tea, simply pour some boiling water over a couple green tea bags, add the other ingredients listed below, and you'll soon have a home-brewed clone of Lipton's hit drink. Calories not included.

If you've never had a Chelada, the idea of mixing beer with Clamato juice may make your stomach turn. This odd combination of beverages has origins in Mexico that date back to the 1940s, when beer was mixed with lime, salt, and hot sauce or salsa. In early 2008, Anheuser-Busch (Budweiser) and Cadbury-Schweppes (Clamato) teamed up to produce the first canned Chelada beverage, which they dubbed "The Red One," and after a successful launch in select western states, the product is now exploding across the country. Many swear by the drink as a remarkable hangover cure, and after some extensive personal experimentation, I must concur.

Click here for more famous drink recipes.

It was in the 1960s that deliveryman Vinnie Gruppuso got hooked on the pudding being made at one of the delis in Brooklyn where he delivered bread. Vinnie struck up a deal with that deli—called Cozy Shack—to sell the pudding to other customers on his route, and the product soon outsold his other delivery items. Eventually Vinnie scrapped up enough money to purchase the deli's pudding operation, he changed the "C" in the name to a "K," and today Kozy Shack is the number one manufacturer of rice pudding in North America. As with the original secret formula, six basic ingredients are all that go into this clone of the company's top-seller. But you'll also need a cooking thermometer and a large pot with at least a 10-inch diameter. A pot this wide helps the mixture to reduce faster. Keep your eye on the temperature and be sure to stir the pudding often. When the mixture begins to thicken, pop the pudding into your fridge for several hours where it will continue to thicken to the creamy consistency of the real thing as it cools.

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  • .
  • 21


Brand-Name Recipes

Welcome. You just found copycat recipes for all of your favorite famous foods! Bestselling author and TV host Todd Wilbur shows you how to duplicate the taste of iconic dishes and treats at home. Todd's recipes are easy to follow and fun to make. Search for recipes by brand name here. New recipes added every week.

  • 1
  • .
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9
  • 10
  • 11
  • 12
  • 13
  • 14
  • .
  • 21

This recipe makes a little more of the popular mixer than you'll get in the 34-ounce plastic bottles at the store. So now when you crave a frosty margarita or snappy whiskey sour and don't have any sweet-and-sour mix on hand, you can make a quick batch from scratch. Mix drinks with this stuff as you would the real sweet-and-sour mix in your favorite cocktails and party libations.

Louisiana chef Paul Prudhomme, America's number one Dom DeLuise look-a-like, hit it big in supermarkets with his magical brand of Cajun spice blends. Chef Paul developed his seasonings after years of making little batches and passing them out to customers in the restaurants where he worked. Now his Magic Seasoning Blends come in several varieties and are produced in a whopping 30,000-square-foot plant by 38 employees. Fortunately, it'll take only one of you in a small kitchen to make a clone of one of the most popular versions of the blend. Use it when you barbecue, roast, grill, or saute your favorite chicken, turkey, duck, or Cornish game hens.

Click here for more famous seasoning and spice blend clone recipes.

Put on a big red smile. Now you can make your own version of the popular convenience store slush, complete with brain freeze. You must have a blender to make this clone of 7-Eleven's Slurpee, and enough room to stick that blender into your freezer to get it nice and thick. This recipe gets close to the original with Kool-Aid mix and a little help from cherry extract, but you can make this drink with any flavor Kool-Aid mix (if you decide to make some variations, don't worry about adding extract). This recipe makes enough to fill one of those giant-size 32-ounce cups you find at the convenience store. Now I should hack the spoon-straws.

In 1995 when I cloned Snapple iced teas in More Top Secret Recipes, I picked several varieties of the tea and used either concentrated juices or extracts for the fruity essence. Since that time, Snapple was sold to Quaker and the less popular flavors were retired to the land of the dead foods. But a clone for one of the most popular flavors of ice tea eluded me back then, since there was no common extract or juice concentrate to turn to for that flavor. Bummer too, since Snapple's raspberry iced tea is a top seller. Today, thanks to the popularity of flavored coffee drinks, flavored syrups can be found in supermarkets. The most common brand is Torani. Get some of the raspberry flavor and you can clone this secret recipe for a fraction of the cost of the real thing.

Kellogg's reacted to spectacular sales of its Rice Krispies Treats with two new varieties of the popular and addictive snack, and TSR got on the case. Just about everyone has tasted the original Rice Krispies Treats. The homemade version is the first assignment in Cooking 101, after learning how to boil water. And the Kellogg's store-bought packaged version has been available for several years now. This variety, however, puts that whole Reese's "You got your peanut butter in my chocolate" thing to work. But don't be fooled by that dark "chocolatey" coating on top. It's not actually chocolate, but rather a melt-resistant custom blend of cocoa and, uh, stuff, that tastes like chocolate but adds longer shelf-life. In the hack lab we don't use such ingredients. Instead we'll melt some real chocolate in the microwave to top our cinch of a crispy clone. Much better.

If you love the taste of Sunny D but wish it were made with more than just 5 percent real fruit juice, this is the Sunny Delight recipe for you. Rustle up some frozen juice concentrates and let them thaw out before measuring. Since tangerine juice concentrate is tough to find on its own, I designed the Sunny Delight orange juice recipe to use the orange/tangerine blend concentrate from Minute Maid.

Bailey's uses a special process to combine two otherwise incompatible ingredients: cream and whiskey. This secret technique keeps the cream from clumping and separating from the whiskey, and allows the liqueur to go for two years unrefrigerated without spoiling. But we won't need to tap into any secret preparation techniques for our clone here since well be storing the liqueur in the refrigerator. We will, however, replace cream with canned evaporated milk. This gives us a properly sweetened finished product with the taste and texture of the deliciously famous Irish cream. Here now is an improved version of the Bailey's clone recipe that appears in More Top Secret Recipes. This version has fewer ingredients, is easier to make, and tastes amazing.

Make more fun copycat cocktails and liqueurs with my recipes here.

I was having trouble getting the flavors just right for Lipton's bottled diet green tea, which has become such a big seller. Real lime juice wasn't cutting it, nor were any of the extracts or oils I tried. Then, one day, I stumbled onto a new product called True Lime. It's a crystallized lime substitute that's made with lime juice and lime oil, and it comes in 2.85-ounce bottles or in boxes of 40 packets. It can be found in the baking aisle of your local supermarket, and it can be used for cooking wherever lime juice is required, or you can dissolve it in beverages. Had I found my secret ingredient? After some experimenting, I discovered that the citric acid in True Lime adds just the right amount of acidic tang that we need for a clone that tastes like the original product (which also contains citric acid). Success! To make your own version of this popular bottled green tea, simply pour some boiling water over a couple green tea bags, add the other ingredients listed below, and you'll soon have a home-brewed clone of Lipton's hit drink. Calories not included.

If you've never had a Chelada, the idea of mixing beer with Clamato juice may make your stomach turn. This odd combination of beverages has origins in Mexico that date back to the 1940s, when beer was mixed with lime, salt, and hot sauce or salsa. In early 2008, Anheuser-Busch (Budweiser) and Cadbury-Schweppes (Clamato) teamed up to produce the first canned Chelada beverage, which they dubbed "The Red One," and after a successful launch in select western states, the product is now exploding across the country. Many swear by the drink as a remarkable hangover cure, and after some extensive personal experimentation, I must concur.

Click here for more famous drink recipes.

It was in the 1960s that deliveryman Vinnie Gruppuso got hooked on the pudding being made at one of the delis in Brooklyn where he delivered bread. Vinnie struck up a deal with that deli—called Cozy Shack—to sell the pudding to other customers on his route, and the product soon outsold his other delivery items. Eventually Vinnie scrapped up enough money to purchase the deli's pudding operation, he changed the "C" in the name to a "K," and today Kozy Shack is the number one manufacturer of rice pudding in North America. As with the original secret formula, six basic ingredients are all that go into this clone of the company's top-seller. But you'll also need a cooking thermometer and a large pot with at least a 10-inch diameter. A pot this wide helps the mixture to reduce faster. Keep your eye on the temperature and be sure to stir the pudding often. When the mixture begins to thicken, pop the pudding into your fridge for several hours where it will continue to thicken to the creamy consistency of the real thing as it cools.

  • 1
  • .
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9
  • 10
  • 11
  • 12
  • 13
  • 14
  • .
  • 21


Brand-Name Recipes

Welcome. You just found copycat recipes for all of your favorite famous foods! Bestselling author and TV host Todd Wilbur shows you how to duplicate the taste of iconic dishes and treats at home. Todd's recipes are easy to follow and fun to make. Search for recipes by brand name here. New recipes added every week.

  • 1
  • .
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9
  • 10
  • 11
  • 12
  • 13
  • 14
  • .
  • 21

This recipe makes a little more of the popular mixer than you'll get in the 34-ounce plastic bottles at the store. So now when you crave a frosty margarita or snappy whiskey sour and don't have any sweet-and-sour mix on hand, you can make a quick batch from scratch. Mix drinks with this stuff as you would the real sweet-and-sour mix in your favorite cocktails and party libations.

Louisiana chef Paul Prudhomme, America's number one Dom DeLuise look-a-like, hit it big in supermarkets with his magical brand of Cajun spice blends. Chef Paul developed his seasonings after years of making little batches and passing them out to customers in the restaurants where he worked. Now his Magic Seasoning Blends come in several varieties and are produced in a whopping 30,000-square-foot plant by 38 employees. Fortunately, it'll take only one of you in a small kitchen to make a clone of one of the most popular versions of the blend. Use it when you barbecue, roast, grill, or saute your favorite chicken, turkey, duck, or Cornish game hens.

Click here for more famous seasoning and spice blend clone recipes.

Put on a big red smile. Now you can make your own version of the popular convenience store slush, complete with brain freeze. You must have a blender to make this clone of 7-Eleven's Slurpee, and enough room to stick that blender into your freezer to get it nice and thick. This recipe gets close to the original with Kool-Aid mix and a little help from cherry extract, but you can make this drink with any flavor Kool-Aid mix (if you decide to make some variations, don't worry about adding extract). This recipe makes enough to fill one of those giant-size 32-ounce cups you find at the convenience store. Now I should hack the spoon-straws.

In 1995 when I cloned Snapple iced teas in More Top Secret Recipes, I picked several varieties of the tea and used either concentrated juices or extracts for the fruity essence. Since that time, Snapple was sold to Quaker and the less popular flavors were retired to the land of the dead foods. But a clone for one of the most popular flavors of ice tea eluded me back then, since there was no common extract or juice concentrate to turn to for that flavor. Bummer too, since Snapple's raspberry iced tea is a top seller. Today, thanks to the popularity of flavored coffee drinks, flavored syrups can be found in supermarkets. The most common brand is Torani. Get some of the raspberry flavor and you can clone this secret recipe for a fraction of the cost of the real thing.

Kellogg's reacted to spectacular sales of its Rice Krispies Treats with two new varieties of the popular and addictive snack, and TSR got on the case. Just about everyone has tasted the original Rice Krispies Treats. The homemade version is the first assignment in Cooking 101, after learning how to boil water. And the Kellogg's store-bought packaged version has been available for several years now. This variety, however, puts that whole Reese's "You got your peanut butter in my chocolate" thing to work. But don't be fooled by that dark "chocolatey" coating on top. It's not actually chocolate, but rather a melt-resistant custom blend of cocoa and, uh, stuff, that tastes like chocolate but adds longer shelf-life. In the hack lab we don't use such ingredients. Instead we'll melt some real chocolate in the microwave to top our cinch of a crispy clone. Much better.

If you love the taste of Sunny D but wish it were made with more than just 5 percent real fruit juice, this is the Sunny Delight recipe for you. Rustle up some frozen juice concentrates and let them thaw out before measuring. Since tangerine juice concentrate is tough to find on its own, I designed the Sunny Delight orange juice recipe to use the orange/tangerine blend concentrate from Minute Maid.

Bailey's uses a special process to combine two otherwise incompatible ingredients: cream and whiskey. This secret technique keeps the cream from clumping and separating from the whiskey, and allows the liqueur to go for two years unrefrigerated without spoiling. But we won't need to tap into any secret preparation techniques for our clone here since well be storing the liqueur in the refrigerator. We will, however, replace cream with canned evaporated milk. This gives us a properly sweetened finished product with the taste and texture of the deliciously famous Irish cream. Here now is an improved version of the Bailey's clone recipe that appears in More Top Secret Recipes. This version has fewer ingredients, is easier to make, and tastes amazing.

Make more fun copycat cocktails and liqueurs with my recipes here.

I was having trouble getting the flavors just right for Lipton's bottled diet green tea, which has become such a big seller. Real lime juice wasn't cutting it, nor were any of the extracts or oils I tried. Then, one day, I stumbled onto a new product called True Lime. It's a crystallized lime substitute that's made with lime juice and lime oil, and it comes in 2.85-ounce bottles or in boxes of 40 packets. It can be found in the baking aisle of your local supermarket, and it can be used for cooking wherever lime juice is required, or you can dissolve it in beverages. Had I found my secret ingredient? After some experimenting, I discovered that the citric acid in True Lime adds just the right amount of acidic tang that we need for a clone that tastes like the original product (which also contains citric acid). Success! To make your own version of this popular bottled green tea, simply pour some boiling water over a couple green tea bags, add the other ingredients listed below, and you'll soon have a home-brewed clone of Lipton's hit drink. Calories not included.

If you've never had a Chelada, the idea of mixing beer with Clamato juice may make your stomach turn. This odd combination of beverages has origins in Mexico that date back to the 1940s, when beer was mixed with lime, salt, and hot sauce or salsa. In early 2008, Anheuser-Busch (Budweiser) and Cadbury-Schweppes (Clamato) teamed up to produce the first canned Chelada beverage, which they dubbed "The Red One," and after a successful launch in select western states, the product is now exploding across the country. Many swear by the drink as a remarkable hangover cure, and after some extensive personal experimentation, I must concur.

Click here for more famous drink recipes.

It was in the 1960s that deliveryman Vinnie Gruppuso got hooked on the pudding being made at one of the delis in Brooklyn where he delivered bread. Vinnie struck up a deal with that deli—called Cozy Shack—to sell the pudding to other customers on his route, and the product soon outsold his other delivery items. Eventually Vinnie scrapped up enough money to purchase the deli's pudding operation, he changed the "C" in the name to a "K," and today Kozy Shack is the number one manufacturer of rice pudding in North America. As with the original secret formula, six basic ingredients are all that go into this clone of the company's top-seller. But you'll also need a cooking thermometer and a large pot with at least a 10-inch diameter. A pot this wide helps the mixture to reduce faster. Keep your eye on the temperature and be sure to stir the pudding often. When the mixture begins to thicken, pop the pudding into your fridge for several hours where it will continue to thicken to the creamy consistency of the real thing as it cools.

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Brand-Name Recipes

Welcome. You just found copycat recipes for all of your favorite famous foods! Bestselling author and TV host Todd Wilbur shows you how to duplicate the taste of iconic dishes and treats at home. Todd's recipes are easy to follow and fun to make. Search for recipes by brand name here. New recipes added every week.

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This recipe makes a little more of the popular mixer than you'll get in the 34-ounce plastic bottles at the store. So now when you crave a frosty margarita or snappy whiskey sour and don't have any sweet-and-sour mix on hand, you can make a quick batch from scratch. Mix drinks with this stuff as you would the real sweet-and-sour mix in your favorite cocktails and party libations.

Louisiana chef Paul Prudhomme, America's number one Dom DeLuise look-a-like, hit it big in supermarkets with his magical brand of Cajun spice blends. Chef Paul developed his seasonings after years of making little batches and passing them out to customers in the restaurants where he worked. Now his Magic Seasoning Blends come in several varieties and are produced in a whopping 30,000-square-foot plant by 38 employees. Fortunately, it'll take only one of you in a small kitchen to make a clone of one of the most popular versions of the blend. Use it when you barbecue, roast, grill, or saute your favorite chicken, turkey, duck, or Cornish game hens.

Click here for more famous seasoning and spice blend clone recipes.

Put on a big red smile. Now you can make your own version of the popular convenience store slush, complete with brain freeze. You must have a blender to make this clone of 7-Eleven's Slurpee, and enough room to stick that blender into your freezer to get it nice and thick. This recipe gets close to the original with Kool-Aid mix and a little help from cherry extract, but you can make this drink with any flavor Kool-Aid mix (if you decide to make some variations, don't worry about adding extract). This recipe makes enough to fill one of those giant-size 32-ounce cups you find at the convenience store. Now I should hack the spoon-straws.

In 1995 when I cloned Snapple iced teas in More Top Secret Recipes, I picked several varieties of the tea and used either concentrated juices or extracts for the fruity essence. Since that time, Snapple was sold to Quaker and the less popular flavors were retired to the land of the dead foods. But a clone for one of the most popular flavors of ice tea eluded me back then, since there was no common extract or juice concentrate to turn to for that flavor. Bummer too, since Snapple's raspberry iced tea is a top seller. Today, thanks to the popularity of flavored coffee drinks, flavored syrups can be found in supermarkets. The most common brand is Torani. Get some of the raspberry flavor and you can clone this secret recipe for a fraction of the cost of the real thing.

Kellogg's reacted to spectacular sales of its Rice Krispies Treats with two new varieties of the popular and addictive snack, and TSR got on the case. Just about everyone has tasted the original Rice Krispies Treats. The homemade version is the first assignment in Cooking 101, after learning how to boil water. And the Kellogg's store-bought packaged version has been available for several years now. This variety, however, puts that whole Reese's "You got your peanut butter in my chocolate" thing to work. But don't be fooled by that dark "chocolatey" coating on top. It's not actually chocolate, but rather a melt-resistant custom blend of cocoa and, uh, stuff, that tastes like chocolate but adds longer shelf-life. In the hack lab we don't use such ingredients. Instead we'll melt some real chocolate in the microwave to top our cinch of a crispy clone. Much better.

If you love the taste of Sunny D but wish it were made with more than just 5 percent real fruit juice, this is the Sunny Delight recipe for you. Rustle up some frozen juice concentrates and let them thaw out before measuring. Since tangerine juice concentrate is tough to find on its own, I designed the Sunny Delight orange juice recipe to use the orange/tangerine blend concentrate from Minute Maid.

Bailey's uses a special process to combine two otherwise incompatible ingredients: cream and whiskey. This secret technique keeps the cream from clumping and separating from the whiskey, and allows the liqueur to go for two years unrefrigerated without spoiling. But we won't need to tap into any secret preparation techniques for our clone here since well be storing the liqueur in the refrigerator. We will, however, replace cream with canned evaporated milk. This gives us a properly sweetened finished product with the taste and texture of the deliciously famous Irish cream. Here now is an improved version of the Bailey's clone recipe that appears in More Top Secret Recipes. This version has fewer ingredients, is easier to make, and tastes amazing.

Make more fun copycat cocktails and liqueurs with my recipes here.

I was having trouble getting the flavors just right for Lipton's bottled diet green tea, which has become such a big seller. Real lime juice wasn't cutting it, nor were any of the extracts or oils I tried. Then, one day, I stumbled onto a new product called True Lime. It's a crystallized lime substitute that's made with lime juice and lime oil, and it comes in 2.85-ounce bottles or in boxes of 40 packets. It can be found in the baking aisle of your local supermarket, and it can be used for cooking wherever lime juice is required, or you can dissolve it in beverages. Had I found my secret ingredient? After some experimenting, I discovered that the citric acid in True Lime adds just the right amount of acidic tang that we need for a clone that tastes like the original product (which also contains citric acid). Success! To make your own version of this popular bottled green tea, simply pour some boiling water over a couple green tea bags, add the other ingredients listed below, and you'll soon have a home-brewed clone of Lipton's hit drink. Calories not included.

If you've never had a Chelada, the idea of mixing beer with Clamato juice may make your stomach turn. This odd combination of beverages has origins in Mexico that date back to the 1940s, when beer was mixed with lime, salt, and hot sauce or salsa. In early 2008, Anheuser-Busch (Budweiser) and Cadbury-Schweppes (Clamato) teamed up to produce the first canned Chelada beverage, which they dubbed "The Red One," and after a successful launch in select western states, the product is now exploding across the country. Many swear by the drink as a remarkable hangover cure, and after some extensive personal experimentation, I must concur.

Click here for more famous drink recipes.

It was in the 1960s that deliveryman Vinnie Gruppuso got hooked on the pudding being made at one of the delis in Brooklyn where he delivered bread. Vinnie struck up a deal with that deli—called Cozy Shack—to sell the pudding to other customers on his route, and the product soon outsold his other delivery items. Eventually Vinnie scrapped up enough money to purchase the deli's pudding operation, he changed the "C" in the name to a "K," and today Kozy Shack is the number one manufacturer of rice pudding in North America. As with the original secret formula, six basic ingredients are all that go into this clone of the company's top-seller. But you'll also need a cooking thermometer and a large pot with at least a 10-inch diameter. A pot this wide helps the mixture to reduce faster. Keep your eye on the temperature and be sure to stir the pudding often. When the mixture begins to thicken, pop the pudding into your fridge for several hours where it will continue to thicken to the creamy consistency of the real thing as it cools.

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Brand-Name Recipes

Welcome. You just found copycat recipes for all of your favorite famous foods! Bestselling author and TV host Todd Wilbur shows you how to duplicate the taste of iconic dishes and treats at home. Todd's recipes are easy to follow and fun to make. Search for recipes by brand name here. New recipes added every week.

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  • 7
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This recipe makes a little more of the popular mixer than you'll get in the 34-ounce plastic bottles at the store. So now when you crave a frosty margarita or snappy whiskey sour and don't have any sweet-and-sour mix on hand, you can make a quick batch from scratch. Mix drinks with this stuff as you would the real sweet-and-sour mix in your favorite cocktails and party libations.

Louisiana chef Paul Prudhomme, America's number one Dom DeLuise look-a-like, hit it big in supermarkets with his magical brand of Cajun spice blends. Chef Paul developed his seasonings after years of making little batches and passing them out to customers in the restaurants where he worked. Now his Magic Seasoning Blends come in several varieties and are produced in a whopping 30,000-square-foot plant by 38 employees. Fortunately, it'll take only one of you in a small kitchen to make a clone of one of the most popular versions of the blend. Use it when you barbecue, roast, grill, or saute your favorite chicken, turkey, duck, or Cornish game hens.

Click here for more famous seasoning and spice blend clone recipes.

Put on a big red smile. Now you can make your own version of the popular convenience store slush, complete with brain freeze. You must have a blender to make this clone of 7-Eleven's Slurpee, and enough room to stick that blender into your freezer to get it nice and thick. This recipe gets close to the original with Kool-Aid mix and a little help from cherry extract, but you can make this drink with any flavor Kool-Aid mix (if you decide to make some variations, don't worry about adding extract). This recipe makes enough to fill one of those giant-size 32-ounce cups you find at the convenience store. Now I should hack the spoon-straws.

In 1995 when I cloned Snapple iced teas in More Top Secret Recipes, I picked several varieties of the tea and used either concentrated juices or extracts for the fruity essence. Since that time, Snapple was sold to Quaker and the less popular flavors were retired to the land of the dead foods. But a clone for one of the most popular flavors of ice tea eluded me back then, since there was no common extract or juice concentrate to turn to for that flavor. Bummer too, since Snapple's raspberry iced tea is a top seller. Today, thanks to the popularity of flavored coffee drinks, flavored syrups can be found in supermarkets. The most common brand is Torani. Get some of the raspberry flavor and you can clone this secret recipe for a fraction of the cost of the real thing.

Kellogg's reacted to spectacular sales of its Rice Krispies Treats with two new varieties of the popular and addictive snack, and TSR got on the case. Just about everyone has tasted the original Rice Krispies Treats. The homemade version is the first assignment in Cooking 101, after learning how to boil water. And the Kellogg's store-bought packaged version has been available for several years now. This variety, however, puts that whole Reese's "You got your peanut butter in my chocolate" thing to work. But don't be fooled by that dark "chocolatey" coating on top. It's not actually chocolate, but rather a melt-resistant custom blend of cocoa and, uh, stuff, that tastes like chocolate but adds longer shelf-life. In the hack lab we don't use such ingredients. Instead we'll melt some real chocolate in the microwave to top our cinch of a crispy clone. Much better.

If you love the taste of Sunny D but wish it were made with more than just 5 percent real fruit juice, this is the Sunny Delight recipe for you. Rustle up some frozen juice concentrates and let them thaw out before measuring. Since tangerine juice concentrate is tough to find on its own, I designed the Sunny Delight orange juice recipe to use the orange/tangerine blend concentrate from Minute Maid.

Bailey's uses a special process to combine two otherwise incompatible ingredients: cream and whiskey. This secret technique keeps the cream from clumping and separating from the whiskey, and allows the liqueur to go for two years unrefrigerated without spoiling. But we won't need to tap into any secret preparation techniques for our clone here since well be storing the liqueur in the refrigerator. We will, however, replace cream with canned evaporated milk. This gives us a properly sweetened finished product with the taste and texture of the deliciously famous Irish cream. Here now is an improved version of the Bailey's clone recipe that appears in More Top Secret Recipes. This version has fewer ingredients, is easier to make, and tastes amazing.

Make more fun copycat cocktails and liqueurs with my recipes here.

I was having trouble getting the flavors just right for Lipton's bottled diet green tea, which has become such a big seller. Real lime juice wasn't cutting it, nor were any of the extracts or oils I tried. Then, one day, I stumbled onto a new product called True Lime. It's a crystallized lime substitute that's made with lime juice and lime oil, and it comes in 2.85-ounce bottles or in boxes of 40 packets. It can be found in the baking aisle of your local supermarket, and it can be used for cooking wherever lime juice is required, or you can dissolve it in beverages. Had I found my secret ingredient? After some experimenting, I discovered that the citric acid in True Lime adds just the right amount of acidic tang that we need for a clone that tastes like the original product (which also contains citric acid). Success! To make your own version of this popular bottled green tea, simply pour some boiling water over a couple green tea bags, add the other ingredients listed below, and you'll soon have a home-brewed clone of Lipton's hit drink. Calories not included.

If you've never had a Chelada, the idea of mixing beer with Clamato juice may make your stomach turn. This odd combination of beverages has origins in Mexico that date back to the 1940s, when beer was mixed with lime, salt, and hot sauce or salsa. In early 2008, Anheuser-Busch (Budweiser) and Cadbury-Schweppes (Clamato) teamed up to produce the first canned Chelada beverage, which they dubbed "The Red One," and after a successful launch in select western states, the product is now exploding across the country. Many swear by the drink as a remarkable hangover cure, and after some extensive personal experimentation, I must concur.

Click here for more famous drink recipes.

It was in the 1960s that deliveryman Vinnie Gruppuso got hooked on the pudding being made at one of the delis in Brooklyn where he delivered bread. Vinnie struck up a deal with that deli—called Cozy Shack—to sell the pudding to other customers on his route, and the product soon outsold his other delivery items. Eventually Vinnie scrapped up enough money to purchase the deli's pudding operation, he changed the "C" in the name to a "K," and today Kozy Shack is the number one manufacturer of rice pudding in North America. As with the original secret formula, six basic ingredients are all that go into this clone of the company's top-seller. But you'll also need a cooking thermometer and a large pot with at least a 10-inch diameter. A pot this wide helps the mixture to reduce faster. Keep your eye on the temperature and be sure to stir the pudding often. When the mixture begins to thicken, pop the pudding into your fridge for several hours where it will continue to thicken to the creamy consistency of the real thing as it cools.

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  • 21


Brand-Name Recipes

Welcome. You just found copycat recipes for all of your favorite famous foods! Bestselling author and TV host Todd Wilbur shows you how to duplicate the taste of iconic dishes and treats at home. Todd's recipes are easy to follow and fun to make. Search for recipes by brand name here. New recipes added every week.

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  • .
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9
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  • 12
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  • 14
  • .
  • 21

This recipe makes a little more of the popular mixer than you'll get in the 34-ounce plastic bottles at the store. So now when you crave a frosty margarita or snappy whiskey sour and don't have any sweet-and-sour mix on hand, you can make a quick batch from scratch. Mix drinks with this stuff as you would the real sweet-and-sour mix in your favorite cocktails and party libations.

Louisiana chef Paul Prudhomme, America's number one Dom DeLuise look-a-like, hit it big in supermarkets with his magical brand of Cajun spice blends. Chef Paul developed his seasonings after years of making little batches and passing them out to customers in the restaurants where he worked. Now his Magic Seasoning Blends come in several varieties and are produced in a whopping 30,000-square-foot plant by 38 employees. Fortunately, it'll take only one of you in a small kitchen to make a clone of one of the most popular versions of the blend. Use it when you barbecue, roast, grill, or saute your favorite chicken, turkey, duck, or Cornish game hens.

Click here for more famous seasoning and spice blend clone recipes.

Put on a big red smile. Now you can make your own version of the popular convenience store slush, complete with brain freeze. You must have a blender to make this clone of 7-Eleven's Slurpee, and enough room to stick that blender into your freezer to get it nice and thick. This recipe gets close to the original with Kool-Aid mix and a little help from cherry extract, but you can make this drink with any flavor Kool-Aid mix (if you decide to make some variations, don't worry about adding extract). This recipe makes enough to fill one of those giant-size 32-ounce cups you find at the convenience store. Now I should hack the spoon-straws.

In 1995 when I cloned Snapple iced teas in More Top Secret Recipes, I picked several varieties of the tea and used either concentrated juices or extracts for the fruity essence. Since that time, Snapple was sold to Quaker and the less popular flavors were retired to the land of the dead foods. But a clone for one of the most popular flavors of ice tea eluded me back then, since there was no common extract or juice concentrate to turn to for that flavor. Bummer too, since Snapple's raspberry iced tea is a top seller. Today, thanks to the popularity of flavored coffee drinks, flavored syrups can be found in supermarkets. The most common brand is Torani. Get some of the raspberry flavor and you can clone this secret recipe for a fraction of the cost of the real thing.

Kellogg's reacted to spectacular sales of its Rice Krispies Treats with two new varieties of the popular and addictive snack, and TSR got on the case. Just about everyone has tasted the original Rice Krispies Treats. The homemade version is the first assignment in Cooking 101, after learning how to boil water. And the Kellogg's store-bought packaged version has been available for several years now. This variety, however, puts that whole Reese's "You got your peanut butter in my chocolate" thing to work. But don't be fooled by that dark "chocolatey" coating on top. It's not actually chocolate, but rather a melt-resistant custom blend of cocoa and, uh, stuff, that tastes like chocolate but adds longer shelf-life. In the hack lab we don't use such ingredients. Instead we'll melt some real chocolate in the microwave to top our cinch of a crispy clone. Much better.

If you love the taste of Sunny D but wish it were made with more than just 5 percent real fruit juice, this is the Sunny Delight recipe for you. Rustle up some frozen juice concentrates and let them thaw out before measuring. Since tangerine juice concentrate is tough to find on its own, I designed the Sunny Delight orange juice recipe to use the orange/tangerine blend concentrate from Minute Maid.

Bailey's uses a special process to combine two otherwise incompatible ingredients: cream and whiskey. This secret technique keeps the cream from clumping and separating from the whiskey, and allows the liqueur to go for two years unrefrigerated without spoiling. But we won't need to tap into any secret preparation techniques for our clone here since well be storing the liqueur in the refrigerator. We will, however, replace cream with canned evaporated milk. This gives us a properly sweetened finished product with the taste and texture of the deliciously famous Irish cream. Here now is an improved version of the Bailey's clone recipe that appears in More Top Secret Recipes. This version has fewer ingredients, is easier to make, and tastes amazing.

Make more fun copycat cocktails and liqueurs with my recipes here.

I was having trouble getting the flavors just right for Lipton's bottled diet green tea, which has become such a big seller. Real lime juice wasn't cutting it, nor were any of the extracts or oils I tried. Then, one day, I stumbled onto a new product called True Lime. It's a crystallized lime substitute that's made with lime juice and lime oil, and it comes in 2.85-ounce bottles or in boxes of 40 packets. It can be found in the baking aisle of your local supermarket, and it can be used for cooking wherever lime juice is required, or you can dissolve it in beverages. Had I found my secret ingredient? After some experimenting, I discovered that the citric acid in True Lime adds just the right amount of acidic tang that we need for a clone that tastes like the original product (which also contains citric acid). Success! To make your own version of this popular bottled green tea, simply pour some boiling water over a couple green tea bags, add the other ingredients listed below, and you'll soon have a home-brewed clone of Lipton's hit drink. Calories not included.

If you've never had a Chelada, the idea of mixing beer with Clamato juice may make your stomach turn. This odd combination of beverages has origins in Mexico that date back to the 1940s, when beer was mixed with lime, salt, and hot sauce or salsa. In early 2008, Anheuser-Busch (Budweiser) and Cadbury-Schweppes (Clamato) teamed up to produce the first canned Chelada beverage, which they dubbed "The Red One," and after a successful launch in select western states, the product is now exploding across the country. Many swear by the drink as a remarkable hangover cure, and after some extensive personal experimentation, I must concur.

Click here for more famous drink recipes.

It was in the 1960s that deliveryman Vinnie Gruppuso got hooked on the pudding being made at one of the delis in Brooklyn where he delivered bread. Vinnie struck up a deal with that deli—called Cozy Shack—to sell the pudding to other customers on his route, and the product soon outsold his other delivery items. Eventually Vinnie scrapped up enough money to purchase the deli's pudding operation, he changed the "C" in the name to a "K," and today Kozy Shack is the number one manufacturer of rice pudding in North America. As with the original secret formula, six basic ingredients are all that go into this clone of the company's top-seller. But you'll also need a cooking thermometer and a large pot with at least a 10-inch diameter. A pot this wide helps the mixture to reduce faster. Keep your eye on the temperature and be sure to stir the pudding often. When the mixture begins to thicken, pop the pudding into your fridge for several hours where it will continue to thicken to the creamy consistency of the real thing as it cools.

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  • 9
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  • 12
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  • 14
  • .
  • 21


Brand-Name Recipes

Welcome. You just found copycat recipes for all of your favorite famous foods! Bestselling author and TV host Todd Wilbur shows you how to duplicate the taste of iconic dishes and treats at home. Todd's recipes are easy to follow and fun to make. Search for recipes by brand name here. New recipes added every week.

  • 1
  • .
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9
  • 10
  • 11
  • 12
  • 13
  • 14
  • .
  • 21

This recipe makes a little more of the popular mixer than you'll get in the 34-ounce plastic bottles at the store. So now when you crave a frosty margarita or snappy whiskey sour and don't have any sweet-and-sour mix on hand, you can make a quick batch from scratch. Mix drinks with this stuff as you would the real sweet-and-sour mix in your favorite cocktails and party libations.

Louisiana chef Paul Prudhomme, America's number one Dom DeLuise look-a-like, hit it big in supermarkets with his magical brand of Cajun spice blends. Chef Paul developed his seasonings after years of making little batches and passing them out to customers in the restaurants where he worked. Now his Magic Seasoning Blends come in several varieties and are produced in a whopping 30,000-square-foot plant by 38 employees. Fortunately, it'll take only one of you in a small kitchen to make a clone of one of the most popular versions of the blend. Use it when you barbecue, roast, grill, or saute your favorite chicken, turkey, duck, or Cornish game hens.

Click here for more famous seasoning and spice blend clone recipes.

Put on a big red smile. Now you can make your own version of the popular convenience store slush, complete with brain freeze. You must have a blender to make this clone of 7-Eleven's Slurpee, and enough room to stick that blender into your freezer to get it nice and thick. This recipe gets close to the original with Kool-Aid mix and a little help from cherry extract, but you can make this drink with any flavor Kool-Aid mix (if you decide to make some variations, don't worry about adding extract). This recipe makes enough to fill one of those giant-size 32-ounce cups you find at the convenience store. Now I should hack the spoon-straws.

In 1995 when I cloned Snapple iced teas in More Top Secret Recipes, I picked several varieties of the tea and used either concentrated juices or extracts for the fruity essence. Since that time, Snapple was sold to Quaker and the less popular flavors were retired to the land of the dead foods. But a clone for one of the most popular flavors of ice tea eluded me back then, since there was no common extract or juice concentrate to turn to for that flavor. Bummer too, since Snapple's raspberry iced tea is a top seller. Today, thanks to the popularity of flavored coffee drinks, flavored syrups can be found in supermarkets. The most common brand is Torani. Get some of the raspberry flavor and you can clone this secret recipe for a fraction of the cost of the real thing.

Kellogg's reacted to spectacular sales of its Rice Krispies Treats with two new varieties of the popular and addictive snack, and TSR got on the case. Just about everyone has tasted the original Rice Krispies Treats. The homemade version is the first assignment in Cooking 101, after learning how to boil water. And the Kellogg's store-bought packaged version has been available for several years now. This variety, however, puts that whole Reese's "You got your peanut butter in my chocolate" thing to work. But don't be fooled by that dark "chocolatey" coating on top. It's not actually chocolate, but rather a melt-resistant custom blend of cocoa and, uh, stuff, that tastes like chocolate but adds longer shelf-life. In the hack lab we don't use such ingredients. Instead we'll melt some real chocolate in the microwave to top our cinch of a crispy clone. Much better.

If you love the taste of Sunny D but wish it were made with more than just 5 percent real fruit juice, this is the Sunny Delight recipe for you. Rustle up some frozen juice concentrates and let them thaw out before measuring. Since tangerine juice concentrate is tough to find on its own, I designed the Sunny Delight orange juice recipe to use the orange/tangerine blend concentrate from Minute Maid.

Bailey's uses a special process to combine two otherwise incompatible ingredients: cream and whiskey. This secret technique keeps the cream from clumping and separating from the whiskey, and allows the liqueur to go for two years unrefrigerated without spoiling. But we won't need to tap into any secret preparation techniques for our clone here since well be storing the liqueur in the refrigerator. We will, however, replace cream with canned evaporated milk. This gives us a properly sweetened finished product with the taste and texture of the deliciously famous Irish cream. Here now is an improved version of the Bailey's clone recipe that appears in More Top Secret Recipes. This version has fewer ingredients, is easier to make, and tastes amazing.

Make more fun copycat cocktails and liqueurs with my recipes here.

I was having trouble getting the flavors just right for Lipton's bottled diet green tea, which has become such a big seller. Real lime juice wasn't cutting it, nor were any of the extracts or oils I tried. Then, one day, I stumbled onto a new product called True Lime. It's a crystallized lime substitute that's made with lime juice and lime oil, and it comes in 2.85-ounce bottles or in boxes of 40 packets. It can be found in the baking aisle of your local supermarket, and it can be used for cooking wherever lime juice is required, or you can dissolve it in beverages. Had I found my secret ingredient? After some experimenting, I discovered that the citric acid in True Lime adds just the right amount of acidic tang that we need for a clone that tastes like the original product (which also contains citric acid). Success! To make your own version of this popular bottled green tea, simply pour some boiling water over a couple green tea bags, add the other ingredients listed below, and you'll soon have a home-brewed clone of Lipton's hit drink. Calories not included.

If you've never had a Chelada, the idea of mixing beer with Clamato juice may make your stomach turn. This odd combination of beverages has origins in Mexico that date back to the 1940s, when beer was mixed with lime, salt, and hot sauce or salsa. In early 2008, Anheuser-Busch (Budweiser) and Cadbury-Schweppes (Clamato) teamed up to produce the first canned Chelada beverage, which they dubbed "The Red One," and after a successful launch in select western states, the product is now exploding across the country. Many swear by the drink as a remarkable hangover cure, and after some extensive personal experimentation, I must concur.

Click here for more famous drink recipes.

It was in the 1960s that deliveryman Vinnie Gruppuso got hooked on the pudding being made at one of the delis in Brooklyn where he delivered bread. Vinnie struck up a deal with that deli—called Cozy Shack—to sell the pudding to other customers on his route, and the product soon outsold his other delivery items. Eventually Vinnie scrapped up enough money to purchase the deli's pudding operation, he changed the "C" in the name to a "K," and today Kozy Shack is the number one manufacturer of rice pudding in North America. As with the original secret formula, six basic ingredients are all that go into this clone of the company's top-seller. But you'll also need a cooking thermometer and a large pot with at least a 10-inch diameter. A pot this wide helps the mixture to reduce faster. Keep your eye on the temperature and be sure to stir the pudding often. When the mixture begins to thicken, pop the pudding into your fridge for several hours where it will continue to thicken to the creamy consistency of the real thing as it cools.

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Brand-Name Recipes

Welcome. You just found copycat recipes for all of your favorite famous foods! Bestselling author and TV host Todd Wilbur shows you how to duplicate the taste of iconic dishes and treats at home. Todd's recipes are easy to follow and fun to make. Search for recipes by brand name here. New recipes added every week.

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This recipe makes a little more of the popular mixer than you'll get in the 34-ounce plastic bottles at the store. So now when you crave a frosty margarita or snappy whiskey sour and don't have any sweet-and-sour mix on hand, you can make a quick batch from scratch. Mix drinks with this stuff as you would the real sweet-and-sour mix in your favorite cocktails and party libations.

Louisiana chef Paul Prudhomme, America's number one Dom DeLuise look-a-like, hit it big in supermarkets with his magical brand of Cajun spice blends. Chef Paul developed his seasonings after years of making little batches and passing them out to customers in the restaurants where he worked. Now his Magic Seasoning Blends come in several varieties and are produced in a whopping 30,000-square-foot plant by 38 employees. Fortunately, it'll take only one of you in a small kitchen to make a clone of one of the most popular versions of the blend. Use it when you barbecue, roast, grill, or saute your favorite chicken, turkey, duck, or Cornish game hens.

Click here for more famous seasoning and spice blend clone recipes.

Put on a big red smile. Now you can make your own version of the popular convenience store slush, complete with brain freeze. You must have a blender to make this clone of 7-Eleven's Slurpee, and enough room to stick that blender into your freezer to get it nice and thick. This recipe gets close to the original with Kool-Aid mix and a little help from cherry extract, but you can make this drink with any flavor Kool-Aid mix (if you decide to make some variations, don't worry about adding extract). This recipe makes enough to fill one of those giant-size 32-ounce cups you find at the convenience store. Now I should hack the spoon-straws.

In 1995 when I cloned Snapple iced teas in More Top Secret Recipes, I picked several varieties of the tea and used either concentrated juices or extracts for the fruity essence. Since that time, Snapple was sold to Quaker and the less popular flavors were retired to the land of the dead foods. But a clone for one of the most popular flavors of ice tea eluded me back then, since there was no common extract or juice concentrate to turn to for that flavor. Bummer too, since Snapple's raspberry iced tea is a top seller. Today, thanks to the popularity of flavored coffee drinks, flavored syrups can be found in supermarkets. The most common brand is Torani. Get some of the raspberry flavor and you can clone this secret recipe for a fraction of the cost of the real thing.

Kellogg's reacted to spectacular sales of its Rice Krispies Treats with two new varieties of the popular and addictive snack, and TSR got on the case. Just about everyone has tasted the original Rice Krispies Treats. The homemade version is the first assignment in Cooking 101, after learning how to boil water. And the Kellogg's store-bought packaged version has been available for several years now. This variety, however, puts that whole Reese's "You got your peanut butter in my chocolate" thing to work. But don't be fooled by that dark "chocolatey" coating on top. It's not actually chocolate, but rather a melt-resistant custom blend of cocoa and, uh, stuff, that tastes like chocolate but adds longer shelf-life. In the hack lab we don't use such ingredients. Instead we'll melt some real chocolate in the microwave to top our cinch of a crispy clone. Much better.

If you love the taste of Sunny D but wish it were made with more than just 5 percent real fruit juice, this is the Sunny Delight recipe for you. Rustle up some frozen juice concentrates and let them thaw out before measuring. Since tangerine juice concentrate is tough to find on its own, I designed the Sunny Delight orange juice recipe to use the orange/tangerine blend concentrate from Minute Maid.

Bailey's uses a special process to combine two otherwise incompatible ingredients: cream and whiskey. This secret technique keeps the cream from clumping and separating from the whiskey, and allows the liqueur to go for two years unrefrigerated without spoiling. But we won't need to tap into any secret preparation techniques for our clone here since well be storing the liqueur in the refrigerator. We will, however, replace cream with canned evaporated milk. This gives us a properly sweetened finished product with the taste and texture of the deliciously famous Irish cream. Here now is an improved version of the Bailey's clone recipe that appears in More Top Secret Recipes. This version has fewer ingredients, is easier to make, and tastes amazing.

Make more fun copycat cocktails and liqueurs with my recipes here.

I was having trouble getting the flavors just right for Lipton's bottled diet green tea, which has become such a big seller. Real lime juice wasn't cutting it, nor were any of the extracts or oils I tried. Then, one day, I stumbled onto a new product called True Lime. It's a crystallized lime substitute that's made with lime juice and lime oil, and it comes in 2.85-ounce bottles or in boxes of 40 packets. It can be found in the baking aisle of your local supermarket, and it can be used for cooking wherever lime juice is required, or you can dissolve it in beverages. Had I found my secret ingredient? After some experimenting, I discovered that the citric acid in True Lime adds just the right amount of acidic tang that we need for a clone that tastes like the original product (which also contains citric acid). Success! To make your own version of this popular bottled green tea, simply pour some boiling water over a couple green tea bags, add the other ingredients listed below, and you'll soon have a home-brewed clone of Lipton's hit drink. Calories not included.

If you've never had a Chelada, the idea of mixing beer with Clamato juice may make your stomach turn. This odd combination of beverages has origins in Mexico that date back to the 1940s, when beer was mixed with lime, salt, and hot sauce or salsa. In early 2008, Anheuser-Busch (Budweiser) and Cadbury-Schweppes (Clamato) teamed up to produce the first canned Chelada beverage, which they dubbed "The Red One," and after a successful launch in select western states, the product is now exploding across the country. Many swear by the drink as a remarkable hangover cure, and after some extensive personal experimentation, I must concur.

Click here for more famous drink recipes.

It was in the 1960s that deliveryman Vinnie Gruppuso got hooked on the pudding being made at one of the delis in Brooklyn where he delivered bread. Vinnie struck up a deal with that deli—called Cozy Shack—to sell the pudding to other customers on his route, and the product soon outsold his other delivery items. Eventually Vinnie scrapped up enough money to purchase the deli's pudding operation, he changed the "C" in the name to a "K," and today Kozy Shack is the number one manufacturer of rice pudding in North America. As with the original secret formula, six basic ingredients are all that go into this clone of the company's top-seller. But you'll also need a cooking thermometer and a large pot with at least a 10-inch diameter. A pot this wide helps the mixture to reduce faster. Keep your eye on the temperature and be sure to stir the pudding often. When the mixture begins to thicken, pop the pudding into your fridge for several hours where it will continue to thicken to the creamy consistency of the real thing as it cools.

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Watch the video: Drinking Señor Chelada And Answering Questions. AMZTV (August 2022).