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‘Make-Ahead Bread’ Makes It Easy to Have Scratch-Made Bread Every Day

‘Make-Ahead Bread’ Makes It Easy to Have Scratch-Made Bread Every Day



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There are few aromas as irresistible as freshly baked bread. If you’ve ever thought about making your own bread from scratch but have been dissuaded by overly complicated recipes that make you feel as though your chances of success are slim, it’s time to re-think homemade bread; blogger and bread expert Donna Currie’s new cookbook, Make Ahead Bread: 100 Recipes for Melt-In-Your-Mouth Fresh Bread Every Day, makes it easy for everyone to make their own bread from scratch. Her two-step method allows you to do the hard part (mixing and kneading) when you have some extra time and bake the bread the next day — imagine waking up to freshly baked Cinnamon Swirl Bread in the morning with virtually no effort!

Whether you’re an expert when it comes to making bread or are ready to try for the first time, we have some tips for “make-ahead bread,” straight from the expert herself.

Can you talk a little bit about your two-step method? How does it work?
Basically, the idea is that you do the biggest part of the work the day before you bake it. That way, when you’re ready to bake your bread you don’t have much work to do; the dough is ready, the mess is cleaned, and the dishes are put away.

Traditional bread recipes call for a second rise. The recipes in my book eliminate that step; the bread dough rises in the cold of the refrigerator overnight. On baking day, you literally just throw the bread into the oven.

What are some of the benefits of making the bread dough in advance?
Aside from the convenience, it also tastes better. Dough that has a long, slow, cold rise tastes better than bread dough that has been rushed through the process. You can make bread in an hour by rushing everything, but you won’t get the same flavor. It’s the same concept as saving a sourdough starter; you get a much better development of flavor from having the dough rest for a long time.

What are the challenges of making bread dough in advance?
Remembering to bake it the next day! There’s some leeway in the timeline (some doughs can sit in the refrigerator for up to 48 hours) but, in general, you should bake the bread dough 24 hours after you mix it.

You will also want to make sure you have enough space available in the refrigerator. It’s not an issue if you’re making 1 or 2 loaves, but if you want freshly baked bread for Thanksgiving, for example, you’ll have to determine whether you have space 4 pans of dough in there.

What are your top tips for making bread from scratch?
Don’t kill the yeast. When first-time bread-bakers read that the water in the recipe should be lukewarm they often use hot, thinking it’s better. But water that is too hot will actually kill the yeast. My recipes scale it back a bit and call for room temperature or lukewarm water. Because you have plenty of time with a slow, cold rise, you don’t need very warm water to activate the yeast.

And, always consider how the dough feels; don’t rely on the clock. Recipes give you a general timeframe to refer to, but noticing how your bread dough feels is very important; the temperature of individual houses will vary, water temperatures will vary, flours will vary, and people will mis-measure so the amount of time it takes to prepare your bread dough will vary as well. All of my recipes talk about what the dough should feel like. If you’re mixing your dough and you think it needs more water, it probably does — add a little more water; it won’t hurt anything. Bread dough isn’t as formulaic as other types of recipes. If you add a little more flour or a little more water, you will still make bread.

Anything else we should know about making bread from scratch?
Relax and have fun with it. The good thing about learning to make bread is that the basic ingredients are so cheap. Even if you buy a really expensive bag of flour it’s, like, five dollars and will give you 5 to 6 loaves of bread. If you make a loaf of bread and it’s a disaster, you’ve only lost a dollar. So don’t be afraid to experiment with bread dough.

Also, read the recipe at least once before you start baking. Some recipes are simpler and better for beginners; others are more complicated. My book has a range of recipes; some are great for first-time bakers and others are challenging enough for someone who really wants to learn about baking bread. Reading through the recipe will help you determine which bread recipe is best to try first.

For more bread-making tips from Donna, buy a copy of her book, Make Ahead Bread: 100 Recipes for Melt-In-Your-Mouth Fresh Bread Every Day, or visit her blog, Cookistry.

Kristie Collado is The Daily Meal’s Cook Editor. Follow her on Twitter @KColladoCook.


  • 1 cup chopped pecans
  • 2 pounds frozen bread dough -- 24 Rhodes (or similar) frozen dough dinner rolls or 2 1-lb loaves, partially thawed for 1/2 hour and each loaf cut into 12 even pieces
  • 1-1/2 cups sugar
  • 1/8 cup cinnamon
  • 3/4 cup butter, melted

Generously butter a 9x13 baking glass or metal pan. Sprinkle nuts evenly in bottom of pan. Combine sugar and cinnamon in small bowl. Melt butter in separate bowl. Dip each roll or dough piece in butter, then in sugar mixture. Place dipped dough in pan in even rows. Mix remaining butter and sugar mixture distribute evenly over the tops of the dough. Cover with plastic wrap that is coated with cooking spray. Let rise until doubled* and bake uncovered at 350 degrees for 40-50 minutes, until browned and done in center. (Cover loosely with sheet of foil in last 10-15 minutes, if browning too quickly.)

DONENESS TIP: For extra insurance that the center sticky buns are cooked completely, insert an instant-read thermometer half way down a center bun. The internal temperature should be 190-200°.

Remove from oven, let cool in pan for 5 minutes and invert onto serving platter. Serve warm.

*MAKE AHEAD RISING METHODS (times may vary depending on the temperature of your house)
1. Assemble the night before, leave out to rise overnight (approx. 8 hours), and bake first thing in the morning.
2. Assemble 20-24 hours in advance, put in the fridge to partially rise. The next day, remove from fridge and allow to rise at room temperature for 2-3 hours before baking.
3. Assemble 44-48 hours in advance, put in the fridge to rise. Remove from fridge and warm to room temperature for 30 minutes before baking.
4. FREEZER OPTION. Assemble pan, cover and freeze for up to a month in advance. Remove from freezer before you go to bed and let them rise overnight--ready to bake the next morning.

FOR A SMALLER BATCH. Cut all of the ingredients in half to make 12 sticky buns instead of 24. Assemble 12 sticky buns in an 8x8 baking dish, 9" deep dish pie plate, or 9" round cake pan (with 2" tall sides). Reduce the baking time by 5 minutes.

I've been making this recipe for, gulp, over 35 years. (It stuns me that I'm old enough to have made a recipe for that long!) It's a version of a recipe shared with me by my college friend, Penny. She got it from her mother. So, if ever there's been a recipe that is tried-and-true, it's this one.

This can be baked in several kinds of pans, but I have found a 9x13 pan results in the most evenly cooked, easy-to-serve sticky buns. The original recipe was made in a bundt pan--some would call it monkey bread that way. I used a bundt pan for many years--it's pretty and festive that way. Either will work, but I recommend a 9x13 pan if you're feeding a crowd--it's much easier to serve, and every piece is equally good and evenly cooked.

Speed scratch convenience. Speed scratch cooking is when you combine a good quality prepared food with fresh ingredients to make the recipe easier and faster to prepare. This recipe uses frozen bread dough. I suppose you could make your own bread dough from scratch, if that's your thing. But honestly, part of the beauty of this recipe is that you start with ready-made frozen bread dough and end up with something that is gooey and delicious and tastes like it is totally made from scratch.

Make-ahead convenience. This is one of the best things about this recipe. It can be assembled the night before, left out to rise overnight, and baked for breakfast first thing in the morning. I've also discovered that I can make it 1 to 2 days ahead and let it do the rising INSIDE the fridge. That was a new concept for me--I thought that bread dough needed warmth in order to rise. Not so. It needs more time to rise in the fridge, but rise it does! I absolutely love being able to make this well in advance of when I will bake it. There is no preparation or stress that morning. It's perfect for serving to overnight guests, at brunches, and during the holidays. In our family, we have had these sticky buns every Christmas morning and other special occasions for, gulp, over 35 years.

Impress the heck out of your guests. I'm always a bit taken aback by the raves I get from guests when I serve this. It looks hard, and tastes like it must have taken a long time to make. So, they're impressed. When I admit how easy it is, everyone wants the recipe.

Here's a 1-minute video that shows you how simple it is to make these.


  • 1 cup chopped pecans
  • 2 pounds frozen bread dough -- 24 Rhodes (or similar) frozen dough dinner rolls or 2 1-lb loaves, partially thawed for 1/2 hour and each loaf cut into 12 even pieces
  • 1-1/2 cups sugar
  • 1/8 cup cinnamon
  • 3/4 cup butter, melted

Generously butter a 9x13 baking glass or metal pan. Sprinkle nuts evenly in bottom of pan. Combine sugar and cinnamon in small bowl. Melt butter in separate bowl. Dip each roll or dough piece in butter, then in sugar mixture. Place dipped dough in pan in even rows. Mix remaining butter and sugar mixture distribute evenly over the tops of the dough. Cover with plastic wrap that is coated with cooking spray. Let rise until doubled* and bake uncovered at 350 degrees for 40-50 minutes, until browned and done in center. (Cover loosely with sheet of foil in last 10-15 minutes, if browning too quickly.)

DONENESS TIP: For extra insurance that the center sticky buns are cooked completely, insert an instant-read thermometer half way down a center bun. The internal temperature should be 190-200°.

Remove from oven, let cool in pan for 5 minutes and invert onto serving platter. Serve warm.

*MAKE AHEAD RISING METHODS (times may vary depending on the temperature of your house)
1. Assemble the night before, leave out to rise overnight (approx. 8 hours), and bake first thing in the morning.
2. Assemble 20-24 hours in advance, put in the fridge to partially rise. The next day, remove from fridge and allow to rise at room temperature for 2-3 hours before baking.
3. Assemble 44-48 hours in advance, put in the fridge to rise. Remove from fridge and warm to room temperature for 30 minutes before baking.
4. FREEZER OPTION. Assemble pan, cover and freeze for up to a month in advance. Remove from freezer before you go to bed and let them rise overnight--ready to bake the next morning.

FOR A SMALLER BATCH. Cut all of the ingredients in half to make 12 sticky buns instead of 24. Assemble 12 sticky buns in an 8x8 baking dish, 9" deep dish pie plate, or 9" round cake pan (with 2" tall sides). Reduce the baking time by 5 minutes.

I've been making this recipe for, gulp, over 35 years. (It stuns me that I'm old enough to have made a recipe for that long!) It's a version of a recipe shared with me by my college friend, Penny. She got it from her mother. So, if ever there's been a recipe that is tried-and-true, it's this one.

This can be baked in several kinds of pans, but I have found a 9x13 pan results in the most evenly cooked, easy-to-serve sticky buns. The original recipe was made in a bundt pan--some would call it monkey bread that way. I used a bundt pan for many years--it's pretty and festive that way. Either will work, but I recommend a 9x13 pan if you're feeding a crowd--it's much easier to serve, and every piece is equally good and evenly cooked.

Speed scratch convenience. Speed scratch cooking is when you combine a good quality prepared food with fresh ingredients to make the recipe easier and faster to prepare. This recipe uses frozen bread dough. I suppose you could make your own bread dough from scratch, if that's your thing. But honestly, part of the beauty of this recipe is that you start with ready-made frozen bread dough and end up with something that is gooey and delicious and tastes like it is totally made from scratch.

Make-ahead convenience. This is one of the best things about this recipe. It can be assembled the night before, left out to rise overnight, and baked for breakfast first thing in the morning. I've also discovered that I can make it 1 to 2 days ahead and let it do the rising INSIDE the fridge. That was a new concept for me--I thought that bread dough needed warmth in order to rise. Not so. It needs more time to rise in the fridge, but rise it does! I absolutely love being able to make this well in advance of when I will bake it. There is no preparation or stress that morning. It's perfect for serving to overnight guests, at brunches, and during the holidays. In our family, we have had these sticky buns every Christmas morning and other special occasions for, gulp, over 35 years.

Impress the heck out of your guests. I'm always a bit taken aback by the raves I get from guests when I serve this. It looks hard, and tastes like it must have taken a long time to make. So, they're impressed. When I admit how easy it is, everyone wants the recipe.

Here's a 1-minute video that shows you how simple it is to make these.


  • 1 cup chopped pecans
  • 2 pounds frozen bread dough -- 24 Rhodes (or similar) frozen dough dinner rolls or 2 1-lb loaves, partially thawed for 1/2 hour and each loaf cut into 12 even pieces
  • 1-1/2 cups sugar
  • 1/8 cup cinnamon
  • 3/4 cup butter, melted

Generously butter a 9x13 baking glass or metal pan. Sprinkle nuts evenly in bottom of pan. Combine sugar and cinnamon in small bowl. Melt butter in separate bowl. Dip each roll or dough piece in butter, then in sugar mixture. Place dipped dough in pan in even rows. Mix remaining butter and sugar mixture distribute evenly over the tops of the dough. Cover with plastic wrap that is coated with cooking spray. Let rise until doubled* and bake uncovered at 350 degrees for 40-50 minutes, until browned and done in center. (Cover loosely with sheet of foil in last 10-15 minutes, if browning too quickly.)

DONENESS TIP: For extra insurance that the center sticky buns are cooked completely, insert an instant-read thermometer half way down a center bun. The internal temperature should be 190-200°.

Remove from oven, let cool in pan for 5 minutes and invert onto serving platter. Serve warm.

*MAKE AHEAD RISING METHODS (times may vary depending on the temperature of your house)
1. Assemble the night before, leave out to rise overnight (approx. 8 hours), and bake first thing in the morning.
2. Assemble 20-24 hours in advance, put in the fridge to partially rise. The next day, remove from fridge and allow to rise at room temperature for 2-3 hours before baking.
3. Assemble 44-48 hours in advance, put in the fridge to rise. Remove from fridge and warm to room temperature for 30 minutes before baking.
4. FREEZER OPTION. Assemble pan, cover and freeze for up to a month in advance. Remove from freezer before you go to bed and let them rise overnight--ready to bake the next morning.

FOR A SMALLER BATCH. Cut all of the ingredients in half to make 12 sticky buns instead of 24. Assemble 12 sticky buns in an 8x8 baking dish, 9" deep dish pie plate, or 9" round cake pan (with 2" tall sides). Reduce the baking time by 5 minutes.

I've been making this recipe for, gulp, over 35 years. (It stuns me that I'm old enough to have made a recipe for that long!) It's a version of a recipe shared with me by my college friend, Penny. She got it from her mother. So, if ever there's been a recipe that is tried-and-true, it's this one.

This can be baked in several kinds of pans, but I have found a 9x13 pan results in the most evenly cooked, easy-to-serve sticky buns. The original recipe was made in a bundt pan--some would call it monkey bread that way. I used a bundt pan for many years--it's pretty and festive that way. Either will work, but I recommend a 9x13 pan if you're feeding a crowd--it's much easier to serve, and every piece is equally good and evenly cooked.

Speed scratch convenience. Speed scratch cooking is when you combine a good quality prepared food with fresh ingredients to make the recipe easier and faster to prepare. This recipe uses frozen bread dough. I suppose you could make your own bread dough from scratch, if that's your thing. But honestly, part of the beauty of this recipe is that you start with ready-made frozen bread dough and end up with something that is gooey and delicious and tastes like it is totally made from scratch.

Make-ahead convenience. This is one of the best things about this recipe. It can be assembled the night before, left out to rise overnight, and baked for breakfast first thing in the morning. I've also discovered that I can make it 1 to 2 days ahead and let it do the rising INSIDE the fridge. That was a new concept for me--I thought that bread dough needed warmth in order to rise. Not so. It needs more time to rise in the fridge, but rise it does! I absolutely love being able to make this well in advance of when I will bake it. There is no preparation or stress that morning. It's perfect for serving to overnight guests, at brunches, and during the holidays. In our family, we have had these sticky buns every Christmas morning and other special occasions for, gulp, over 35 years.

Impress the heck out of your guests. I'm always a bit taken aback by the raves I get from guests when I serve this. It looks hard, and tastes like it must have taken a long time to make. So, they're impressed. When I admit how easy it is, everyone wants the recipe.

Here's a 1-minute video that shows you how simple it is to make these.


  • 1 cup chopped pecans
  • 2 pounds frozen bread dough -- 24 Rhodes (or similar) frozen dough dinner rolls or 2 1-lb loaves, partially thawed for 1/2 hour and each loaf cut into 12 even pieces
  • 1-1/2 cups sugar
  • 1/8 cup cinnamon
  • 3/4 cup butter, melted

Generously butter a 9x13 baking glass or metal pan. Sprinkle nuts evenly in bottom of pan. Combine sugar and cinnamon in small bowl. Melt butter in separate bowl. Dip each roll or dough piece in butter, then in sugar mixture. Place dipped dough in pan in even rows. Mix remaining butter and sugar mixture distribute evenly over the tops of the dough. Cover with plastic wrap that is coated with cooking spray. Let rise until doubled* and bake uncovered at 350 degrees for 40-50 minutes, until browned and done in center. (Cover loosely with sheet of foil in last 10-15 minutes, if browning too quickly.)

DONENESS TIP: For extra insurance that the center sticky buns are cooked completely, insert an instant-read thermometer half way down a center bun. The internal temperature should be 190-200°.

Remove from oven, let cool in pan for 5 minutes and invert onto serving platter. Serve warm.

*MAKE AHEAD RISING METHODS (times may vary depending on the temperature of your house)
1. Assemble the night before, leave out to rise overnight (approx. 8 hours), and bake first thing in the morning.
2. Assemble 20-24 hours in advance, put in the fridge to partially rise. The next day, remove from fridge and allow to rise at room temperature for 2-3 hours before baking.
3. Assemble 44-48 hours in advance, put in the fridge to rise. Remove from fridge and warm to room temperature for 30 minutes before baking.
4. FREEZER OPTION. Assemble pan, cover and freeze for up to a month in advance. Remove from freezer before you go to bed and let them rise overnight--ready to bake the next morning.

FOR A SMALLER BATCH. Cut all of the ingredients in half to make 12 sticky buns instead of 24. Assemble 12 sticky buns in an 8x8 baking dish, 9" deep dish pie plate, or 9" round cake pan (with 2" tall sides). Reduce the baking time by 5 minutes.

I've been making this recipe for, gulp, over 35 years. (It stuns me that I'm old enough to have made a recipe for that long!) It's a version of a recipe shared with me by my college friend, Penny. She got it from her mother. So, if ever there's been a recipe that is tried-and-true, it's this one.

This can be baked in several kinds of pans, but I have found a 9x13 pan results in the most evenly cooked, easy-to-serve sticky buns. The original recipe was made in a bundt pan--some would call it monkey bread that way. I used a bundt pan for many years--it's pretty and festive that way. Either will work, but I recommend a 9x13 pan if you're feeding a crowd--it's much easier to serve, and every piece is equally good and evenly cooked.

Speed scratch convenience. Speed scratch cooking is when you combine a good quality prepared food with fresh ingredients to make the recipe easier and faster to prepare. This recipe uses frozen bread dough. I suppose you could make your own bread dough from scratch, if that's your thing. But honestly, part of the beauty of this recipe is that you start with ready-made frozen bread dough and end up with something that is gooey and delicious and tastes like it is totally made from scratch.

Make-ahead convenience. This is one of the best things about this recipe. It can be assembled the night before, left out to rise overnight, and baked for breakfast first thing in the morning. I've also discovered that I can make it 1 to 2 days ahead and let it do the rising INSIDE the fridge. That was a new concept for me--I thought that bread dough needed warmth in order to rise. Not so. It needs more time to rise in the fridge, but rise it does! I absolutely love being able to make this well in advance of when I will bake it. There is no preparation or stress that morning. It's perfect for serving to overnight guests, at brunches, and during the holidays. In our family, we have had these sticky buns every Christmas morning and other special occasions for, gulp, over 35 years.

Impress the heck out of your guests. I'm always a bit taken aback by the raves I get from guests when I serve this. It looks hard, and tastes like it must have taken a long time to make. So, they're impressed. When I admit how easy it is, everyone wants the recipe.

Here's a 1-minute video that shows you how simple it is to make these.


  • 1 cup chopped pecans
  • 2 pounds frozen bread dough -- 24 Rhodes (or similar) frozen dough dinner rolls or 2 1-lb loaves, partially thawed for 1/2 hour and each loaf cut into 12 even pieces
  • 1-1/2 cups sugar
  • 1/8 cup cinnamon
  • 3/4 cup butter, melted

Generously butter a 9x13 baking glass or metal pan. Sprinkle nuts evenly in bottom of pan. Combine sugar and cinnamon in small bowl. Melt butter in separate bowl. Dip each roll or dough piece in butter, then in sugar mixture. Place dipped dough in pan in even rows. Mix remaining butter and sugar mixture distribute evenly over the tops of the dough. Cover with plastic wrap that is coated with cooking spray. Let rise until doubled* and bake uncovered at 350 degrees for 40-50 minutes, until browned and done in center. (Cover loosely with sheet of foil in last 10-15 minutes, if browning too quickly.)

DONENESS TIP: For extra insurance that the center sticky buns are cooked completely, insert an instant-read thermometer half way down a center bun. The internal temperature should be 190-200°.

Remove from oven, let cool in pan for 5 minutes and invert onto serving platter. Serve warm.

*MAKE AHEAD RISING METHODS (times may vary depending on the temperature of your house)
1. Assemble the night before, leave out to rise overnight (approx. 8 hours), and bake first thing in the morning.
2. Assemble 20-24 hours in advance, put in the fridge to partially rise. The next day, remove from fridge and allow to rise at room temperature for 2-3 hours before baking.
3. Assemble 44-48 hours in advance, put in the fridge to rise. Remove from fridge and warm to room temperature for 30 minutes before baking.
4. FREEZER OPTION. Assemble pan, cover and freeze for up to a month in advance. Remove from freezer before you go to bed and let them rise overnight--ready to bake the next morning.

FOR A SMALLER BATCH. Cut all of the ingredients in half to make 12 sticky buns instead of 24. Assemble 12 sticky buns in an 8x8 baking dish, 9" deep dish pie plate, or 9" round cake pan (with 2" tall sides). Reduce the baking time by 5 minutes.

I've been making this recipe for, gulp, over 35 years. (It stuns me that I'm old enough to have made a recipe for that long!) It's a version of a recipe shared with me by my college friend, Penny. She got it from her mother. So, if ever there's been a recipe that is tried-and-true, it's this one.

This can be baked in several kinds of pans, but I have found a 9x13 pan results in the most evenly cooked, easy-to-serve sticky buns. The original recipe was made in a bundt pan--some would call it monkey bread that way. I used a bundt pan for many years--it's pretty and festive that way. Either will work, but I recommend a 9x13 pan if you're feeding a crowd--it's much easier to serve, and every piece is equally good and evenly cooked.

Speed scratch convenience. Speed scratch cooking is when you combine a good quality prepared food with fresh ingredients to make the recipe easier and faster to prepare. This recipe uses frozen bread dough. I suppose you could make your own bread dough from scratch, if that's your thing. But honestly, part of the beauty of this recipe is that you start with ready-made frozen bread dough and end up with something that is gooey and delicious and tastes like it is totally made from scratch.

Make-ahead convenience. This is one of the best things about this recipe. It can be assembled the night before, left out to rise overnight, and baked for breakfast first thing in the morning. I've also discovered that I can make it 1 to 2 days ahead and let it do the rising INSIDE the fridge. That was a new concept for me--I thought that bread dough needed warmth in order to rise. Not so. It needs more time to rise in the fridge, but rise it does! I absolutely love being able to make this well in advance of when I will bake it. There is no preparation or stress that morning. It's perfect for serving to overnight guests, at brunches, and during the holidays. In our family, we have had these sticky buns every Christmas morning and other special occasions for, gulp, over 35 years.

Impress the heck out of your guests. I'm always a bit taken aback by the raves I get from guests when I serve this. It looks hard, and tastes like it must have taken a long time to make. So, they're impressed. When I admit how easy it is, everyone wants the recipe.

Here's a 1-minute video that shows you how simple it is to make these.


  • 1 cup chopped pecans
  • 2 pounds frozen bread dough -- 24 Rhodes (or similar) frozen dough dinner rolls or 2 1-lb loaves, partially thawed for 1/2 hour and each loaf cut into 12 even pieces
  • 1-1/2 cups sugar
  • 1/8 cup cinnamon
  • 3/4 cup butter, melted

Generously butter a 9x13 baking glass or metal pan. Sprinkle nuts evenly in bottom of pan. Combine sugar and cinnamon in small bowl. Melt butter in separate bowl. Dip each roll or dough piece in butter, then in sugar mixture. Place dipped dough in pan in even rows. Mix remaining butter and sugar mixture distribute evenly over the tops of the dough. Cover with plastic wrap that is coated with cooking spray. Let rise until doubled* and bake uncovered at 350 degrees for 40-50 minutes, until browned and done in center. (Cover loosely with sheet of foil in last 10-15 minutes, if browning too quickly.)

DONENESS TIP: For extra insurance that the center sticky buns are cooked completely, insert an instant-read thermometer half way down a center bun. The internal temperature should be 190-200°.

Remove from oven, let cool in pan for 5 minutes and invert onto serving platter. Serve warm.

*MAKE AHEAD RISING METHODS (times may vary depending on the temperature of your house)
1. Assemble the night before, leave out to rise overnight (approx. 8 hours), and bake first thing in the morning.
2. Assemble 20-24 hours in advance, put in the fridge to partially rise. The next day, remove from fridge and allow to rise at room temperature for 2-3 hours before baking.
3. Assemble 44-48 hours in advance, put in the fridge to rise. Remove from fridge and warm to room temperature for 30 minutes before baking.
4. FREEZER OPTION. Assemble pan, cover and freeze for up to a month in advance. Remove from freezer before you go to bed and let them rise overnight--ready to bake the next morning.

FOR A SMALLER BATCH. Cut all of the ingredients in half to make 12 sticky buns instead of 24. Assemble 12 sticky buns in an 8x8 baking dish, 9" deep dish pie plate, or 9" round cake pan (with 2" tall sides). Reduce the baking time by 5 minutes.

I've been making this recipe for, gulp, over 35 years. (It stuns me that I'm old enough to have made a recipe for that long!) It's a version of a recipe shared with me by my college friend, Penny. She got it from her mother. So, if ever there's been a recipe that is tried-and-true, it's this one.

This can be baked in several kinds of pans, but I have found a 9x13 pan results in the most evenly cooked, easy-to-serve sticky buns. The original recipe was made in a bundt pan--some would call it monkey bread that way. I used a bundt pan for many years--it's pretty and festive that way. Either will work, but I recommend a 9x13 pan if you're feeding a crowd--it's much easier to serve, and every piece is equally good and evenly cooked.

Speed scratch convenience. Speed scratch cooking is when you combine a good quality prepared food with fresh ingredients to make the recipe easier and faster to prepare. This recipe uses frozen bread dough. I suppose you could make your own bread dough from scratch, if that's your thing. But honestly, part of the beauty of this recipe is that you start with ready-made frozen bread dough and end up with something that is gooey and delicious and tastes like it is totally made from scratch.

Make-ahead convenience. This is one of the best things about this recipe. It can be assembled the night before, left out to rise overnight, and baked for breakfast first thing in the morning. I've also discovered that I can make it 1 to 2 days ahead and let it do the rising INSIDE the fridge. That was a new concept for me--I thought that bread dough needed warmth in order to rise. Not so. It needs more time to rise in the fridge, but rise it does! I absolutely love being able to make this well in advance of when I will bake it. There is no preparation or stress that morning. It's perfect for serving to overnight guests, at brunches, and during the holidays. In our family, we have had these sticky buns every Christmas morning and other special occasions for, gulp, over 35 years.

Impress the heck out of your guests. I'm always a bit taken aback by the raves I get from guests when I serve this. It looks hard, and tastes like it must have taken a long time to make. So, they're impressed. When I admit how easy it is, everyone wants the recipe.

Here's a 1-minute video that shows you how simple it is to make these.


  • 1 cup chopped pecans
  • 2 pounds frozen bread dough -- 24 Rhodes (or similar) frozen dough dinner rolls or 2 1-lb loaves, partially thawed for 1/2 hour and each loaf cut into 12 even pieces
  • 1-1/2 cups sugar
  • 1/8 cup cinnamon
  • 3/4 cup butter, melted

Generously butter a 9x13 baking glass or metal pan. Sprinkle nuts evenly in bottom of pan. Combine sugar and cinnamon in small bowl. Melt butter in separate bowl. Dip each roll or dough piece in butter, then in sugar mixture. Place dipped dough in pan in even rows. Mix remaining butter and sugar mixture distribute evenly over the tops of the dough. Cover with plastic wrap that is coated with cooking spray. Let rise until doubled* and bake uncovered at 350 degrees for 40-50 minutes, until browned and done in center. (Cover loosely with sheet of foil in last 10-15 minutes, if browning too quickly.)

DONENESS TIP: For extra insurance that the center sticky buns are cooked completely, insert an instant-read thermometer half way down a center bun. The internal temperature should be 190-200°.

Remove from oven, let cool in pan for 5 minutes and invert onto serving platter. Serve warm.

*MAKE AHEAD RISING METHODS (times may vary depending on the temperature of your house)
1. Assemble the night before, leave out to rise overnight (approx. 8 hours), and bake first thing in the morning.
2. Assemble 20-24 hours in advance, put in the fridge to partially rise. The next day, remove from fridge and allow to rise at room temperature for 2-3 hours before baking.
3. Assemble 44-48 hours in advance, put in the fridge to rise. Remove from fridge and warm to room temperature for 30 minutes before baking.
4. FREEZER OPTION. Assemble pan, cover and freeze for up to a month in advance. Remove from freezer before you go to bed and let them rise overnight--ready to bake the next morning.

FOR A SMALLER BATCH. Cut all of the ingredients in half to make 12 sticky buns instead of 24. Assemble 12 sticky buns in an 8x8 baking dish, 9" deep dish pie plate, or 9" round cake pan (with 2" tall sides). Reduce the baking time by 5 minutes.

I've been making this recipe for, gulp, over 35 years. (It stuns me that I'm old enough to have made a recipe for that long!) It's a version of a recipe shared with me by my college friend, Penny. She got it from her mother. So, if ever there's been a recipe that is tried-and-true, it's this one.

This can be baked in several kinds of pans, but I have found a 9x13 pan results in the most evenly cooked, easy-to-serve sticky buns. The original recipe was made in a bundt pan--some would call it monkey bread that way. I used a bundt pan for many years--it's pretty and festive that way. Either will work, but I recommend a 9x13 pan if you're feeding a crowd--it's much easier to serve, and every piece is equally good and evenly cooked.

Speed scratch convenience. Speed scratch cooking is when you combine a good quality prepared food with fresh ingredients to make the recipe easier and faster to prepare. This recipe uses frozen bread dough. I suppose you could make your own bread dough from scratch, if that's your thing. But honestly, part of the beauty of this recipe is that you start with ready-made frozen bread dough and end up with something that is gooey and delicious and tastes like it is totally made from scratch.

Make-ahead convenience. This is one of the best things about this recipe. It can be assembled the night before, left out to rise overnight, and baked for breakfast first thing in the morning. I've also discovered that I can make it 1 to 2 days ahead and let it do the rising INSIDE the fridge. That was a new concept for me--I thought that bread dough needed warmth in order to rise. Not so. It needs more time to rise in the fridge, but rise it does! I absolutely love being able to make this well in advance of when I will bake it. There is no preparation or stress that morning. It's perfect for serving to overnight guests, at brunches, and during the holidays. In our family, we have had these sticky buns every Christmas morning and other special occasions for, gulp, over 35 years.

Impress the heck out of your guests. I'm always a bit taken aback by the raves I get from guests when I serve this. It looks hard, and tastes like it must have taken a long time to make. So, they're impressed. When I admit how easy it is, everyone wants the recipe.

Here's a 1-minute video that shows you how simple it is to make these.


  • 1 cup chopped pecans
  • 2 pounds frozen bread dough -- 24 Rhodes (or similar) frozen dough dinner rolls or 2 1-lb loaves, partially thawed for 1/2 hour and each loaf cut into 12 even pieces
  • 1-1/2 cups sugar
  • 1/8 cup cinnamon
  • 3/4 cup butter, melted

Generously butter a 9x13 baking glass or metal pan. Sprinkle nuts evenly in bottom of pan. Combine sugar and cinnamon in small bowl. Melt butter in separate bowl. Dip each roll or dough piece in butter, then in sugar mixture. Place dipped dough in pan in even rows. Mix remaining butter and sugar mixture distribute evenly over the tops of the dough. Cover with plastic wrap that is coated with cooking spray. Let rise until doubled* and bake uncovered at 350 degrees for 40-50 minutes, until browned and done in center. (Cover loosely with sheet of foil in last 10-15 minutes, if browning too quickly.)

DONENESS TIP: For extra insurance that the center sticky buns are cooked completely, insert an instant-read thermometer half way down a center bun. The internal temperature should be 190-200°.

Remove from oven, let cool in pan for 5 minutes and invert onto serving platter. Serve warm.

*MAKE AHEAD RISING METHODS (times may vary depending on the temperature of your house)
1. Assemble the night before, leave out to rise overnight (approx. 8 hours), and bake first thing in the morning.
2. Assemble 20-24 hours in advance, put in the fridge to partially rise. The next day, remove from fridge and allow to rise at room temperature for 2-3 hours before baking.
3. Assemble 44-48 hours in advance, put in the fridge to rise. Remove from fridge and warm to room temperature for 30 minutes before baking.
4. FREEZER OPTION. Assemble pan, cover and freeze for up to a month in advance. Remove from freezer before you go to bed and let them rise overnight--ready to bake the next morning.

FOR A SMALLER BATCH. Cut all of the ingredients in half to make 12 sticky buns instead of 24. Assemble 12 sticky buns in an 8x8 baking dish, 9" deep dish pie plate, or 9" round cake pan (with 2" tall sides). Reduce the baking time by 5 minutes.

I've been making this recipe for, gulp, over 35 years. (It stuns me that I'm old enough to have made a recipe for that long!) It's a version of a recipe shared with me by my college friend, Penny. She got it from her mother. So, if ever there's been a recipe that is tried-and-true, it's this one.

This can be baked in several kinds of pans, but I have found a 9x13 pan results in the most evenly cooked, easy-to-serve sticky buns. The original recipe was made in a bundt pan--some would call it monkey bread that way. I used a bundt pan for many years--it's pretty and festive that way. Either will work, but I recommend a 9x13 pan if you're feeding a crowd--it's much easier to serve, and every piece is equally good and evenly cooked.

Speed scratch convenience. Speed scratch cooking is when you combine a good quality prepared food with fresh ingredients to make the recipe easier and faster to prepare. This recipe uses frozen bread dough. I suppose you could make your own bread dough from scratch, if that's your thing. But honestly, part of the beauty of this recipe is that you start with ready-made frozen bread dough and end up with something that is gooey and delicious and tastes like it is totally made from scratch.

Make-ahead convenience. This is one of the best things about this recipe. It can be assembled the night before, left out to rise overnight, and baked for breakfast first thing in the morning. I've also discovered that I can make it 1 to 2 days ahead and let it do the rising INSIDE the fridge. That was a new concept for me--I thought that bread dough needed warmth in order to rise. Not so. It needs more time to rise in the fridge, but rise it does! I absolutely love being able to make this well in advance of when I will bake it. There is no preparation or stress that morning. It's perfect for serving to overnight guests, at brunches, and during the holidays. In our family, we have had these sticky buns every Christmas morning and other special occasions for, gulp, over 35 years.

Impress the heck out of your guests. I'm always a bit taken aback by the raves I get from guests when I serve this. It looks hard, and tastes like it must have taken a long time to make. So, they're impressed. When I admit how easy it is, everyone wants the recipe.

Here's a 1-minute video that shows you how simple it is to make these.


  • 1 cup chopped pecans
  • 2 pounds frozen bread dough -- 24 Rhodes (or similar) frozen dough dinner rolls or 2 1-lb loaves, partially thawed for 1/2 hour and each loaf cut into 12 even pieces
  • 1-1/2 cups sugar
  • 1/8 cup cinnamon
  • 3/4 cup butter, melted

Generously butter a 9x13 baking glass or metal pan. Sprinkle nuts evenly in bottom of pan. Combine sugar and cinnamon in small bowl. Melt butter in separate bowl. Dip each roll or dough piece in butter, then in sugar mixture. Place dipped dough in pan in even rows. Mix remaining butter and sugar mixture distribute evenly over the tops of the dough. Cover with plastic wrap that is coated with cooking spray. Let rise until doubled* and bake uncovered at 350 degrees for 40-50 minutes, until browned and done in center. (Cover loosely with sheet of foil in last 10-15 minutes, if browning too quickly.)

DONENESS TIP: For extra insurance that the center sticky buns are cooked completely, insert an instant-read thermometer half way down a center bun. The internal temperature should be 190-200°.

Remove from oven, let cool in pan for 5 minutes and invert onto serving platter. Serve warm.

*MAKE AHEAD RISING METHODS (times may vary depending on the temperature of your house)
1. Assemble the night before, leave out to rise overnight (approx. 8 hours), and bake first thing in the morning.
2. Assemble 20-24 hours in advance, put in the fridge to partially rise. The next day, remove from fridge and allow to rise at room temperature for 2-3 hours before baking.
3. Assemble 44-48 hours in advance, put in the fridge to rise. Remove from fridge and warm to room temperature for 30 minutes before baking.
4. FREEZER OPTION. Assemble pan, cover and freeze for up to a month in advance. Remove from freezer before you go to bed and let them rise overnight--ready to bake the next morning.

FOR A SMALLER BATCH. Cut all of the ingredients in half to make 12 sticky buns instead of 24. Assemble 12 sticky buns in an 8x8 baking dish, 9" deep dish pie plate, or 9" round cake pan (with 2" tall sides). Reduce the baking time by 5 minutes.

I've been making this recipe for, gulp, over 35 years. (It stuns me that I'm old enough to have made a recipe for that long!) It's a version of a recipe shared with me by my college friend, Penny. She got it from her mother. So, if ever there's been a recipe that is tried-and-true, it's this one.

This can be baked in several kinds of pans, but I have found a 9x13 pan results in the most evenly cooked, easy-to-serve sticky buns. The original recipe was made in a bundt pan--some would call it monkey bread that way. I used a bundt pan for many years--it's pretty and festive that way. Either will work, but I recommend a 9x13 pan if you're feeding a crowd--it's much easier to serve, and every piece is equally good and evenly cooked.

Speed scratch convenience. Speed scratch cooking is when you combine a good quality prepared food with fresh ingredients to make the recipe easier and faster to prepare. This recipe uses frozen bread dough. I suppose you could make your own bread dough from scratch, if that's your thing. But honestly, part of the beauty of this recipe is that you start with ready-made frozen bread dough and end up with something that is gooey and delicious and tastes like it is totally made from scratch.

Make-ahead convenience. This is one of the best things about this recipe. It can be assembled the night before, left out to rise overnight, and baked for breakfast first thing in the morning. I've also discovered that I can make it 1 to 2 days ahead and let it do the rising INSIDE the fridge. That was a new concept for me--I thought that bread dough needed warmth in order to rise. Not so. It needs more time to rise in the fridge, but rise it does! I absolutely love being able to make this well in advance of when I will bake it. There is no preparation or stress that morning. It's perfect for serving to overnight guests, at brunches, and during the holidays. In our family, we have had these sticky buns every Christmas morning and other special occasions for, gulp, over 35 years.

Impress the heck out of your guests. I'm always a bit taken aback by the raves I get from guests when I serve this. It looks hard, and tastes like it must have taken a long time to make. So, they're impressed. When I admit how easy it is, everyone wants the recipe.

Here's a 1-minute video that shows you how simple it is to make these.


  • 1 cup chopped pecans
  • 2 pounds frozen bread dough -- 24 Rhodes (or similar) frozen dough dinner rolls or 2 1-lb loaves, partially thawed for 1/2 hour and each loaf cut into 12 even pieces
  • 1-1/2 cups sugar
  • 1/8 cup cinnamon
  • 3/4 cup butter, melted

Generously butter a 9x13 baking glass or metal pan. Sprinkle nuts evenly in bottom of pan. Combine sugar and cinnamon in small bowl. Melt butter in separate bowl. Dip each roll or dough piece in butter, then in sugar mixture. Place dipped dough in pan in even rows. Mix remaining butter and sugar mixture distribute evenly over the tops of the dough. Cover with plastic wrap that is coated with cooking spray. Let rise until doubled* and bake uncovered at 350 degrees for 40-50 minutes, until browned and done in center. (Cover loosely with sheet of foil in last 10-15 minutes, if browning too quickly.)

DONENESS TIP: For extra insurance that the center sticky buns are cooked completely, insert an instant-read thermometer half way down a center bun. The internal temperature should be 190-200°.

Remove from oven, let cool in pan for 5 minutes and invert onto serving platter. Serve warm.

*MAKE AHEAD RISING METHODS (times may vary depending on the temperature of your house)
1. Assemble the night before, leave out to rise overnight (approx. 8 hours), and bake first thing in the morning.
2. Assemble 20-24 hours in advance, put in the fridge to partially rise. The next day, remove from fridge and allow to rise at room temperature for 2-3 hours before baking.
3. Assemble 44-48 hours in advance, put in the fridge to rise. Remove from fridge and warm to room temperature for 30 minutes before baking.
4. FREEZER OPTION. Assemble pan, cover and freeze for up to a month in advance. Remove from freezer before you go to bed and let them rise overnight--ready to bake the next morning.

FOR A SMALLER BATCH. Cut all of the ingredients in half to make 12 sticky buns instead of 24. Assemble 12 sticky buns in an 8x8 baking dish, 9" deep dish pie plate, or 9" round cake pan (with 2" tall sides). Reduce the baking time by 5 minutes.

I've been making this recipe for, gulp, over 35 years. (It stuns me that I'm old enough to have made a recipe for that long!) It's a version of a recipe shared with me by my college friend, Penny. She got it from her mother. So, if ever there's been a recipe that is tried-and-true, it's this one.

This can be baked in several kinds of pans, but I have found a 9x13 pan results in the most evenly cooked, easy-to-serve sticky buns. The original recipe was made in a bundt pan--some would call it monkey bread that way. I used a bundt pan for many years--it's pretty and festive that way. Either will work, but I recommend a 9x13 pan if you're feeding a crowd--it's much easier to serve, and every piece is equally good and evenly cooked.

Speed scratch convenience. Speed scratch cooking is when you combine a good quality prepared food with fresh ingredients to make the recipe easier and faster to prepare. This recipe uses frozen bread dough. I suppose you could make your own bread dough from scratch, if that's your thing. But honestly, part of the beauty of this recipe is that you start with ready-made frozen bread dough and end up with something that is gooey and delicious and tastes like it is totally made from scratch.

Make-ahead convenience. This is one of the best things about this recipe. It can be assembled the night before, left out to rise overnight, and baked for breakfast first thing in the morning. I've also discovered that I can make it 1 to 2 days ahead and let it do the rising INSIDE the fridge. That was a new concept for me--I thought that bread dough needed warmth in order to rise. Not so. It needs more time to rise in the fridge, but rise it does! I absolutely love being able to make this well in advance of when I will bake it. There is no preparation or stress that morning. It's perfect for serving to overnight guests, at brunches, and during the holidays. In our family, we have had these sticky buns every Christmas morning and other special occasions for, gulp, over 35 years.

Impress the heck out of your guests. I'm always a bit taken aback by the raves I get from guests when I serve this. It looks hard, and tastes like it must have taken a long time to make. So, they're impressed. When I admit how easy it is, everyone wants the recipe.

Here's a 1-minute video that shows you how simple it is to make these.