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Bread, Not Chips, Is America's Biggest Salt Source

Bread, Not Chips, Is America's Biggest Salt Source


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The CDC reports that bread and rolls are the largest sources of sodium

According to the CDC, the top source of sodium in America's diet isn't potato chips or pretzels; rather, the culprit is bread.

The report, released Tuesday, finds that 90 percent of Americans eat more sodium than recommended.

Forty-four percent of sodium consumed comes from just a few items in our diet: breads and rolls, cold cuts and deli meats, pizza, poultry, soups, sandwiches, meat dishes, and chips, pretzels, and popcorn.

"Potato chips, pretzels, and popcorn — which we think of as the saltiest foods in our diet — are only No. 10," CDC director Dr. Thomas Frieden told AP. Bread and rolls aren't necessarily saltier than all the other foods; Americans just eat a lot of the staple.

The study also finds that 65 percent of soidum comes from retail-prepared foods, and about 25 percent come from restaurant foods.

The Daily Byte is a regular column dedicated to covering interesting food news and trends across the country. Click here for previous columns.


7 New World Foods That Changed Europe Forever

There’s much debate whether Christopher Columbus really discovered America in 1492. Historians think there may have been other explorers before Columbus, others think the actual date wasn’t October 12 but rather October 21. At any rate, he gets the credit in many of the history books for his discovery. Even if he didn’t actually discover America, it may be safe to say that Spanish or European explorers discovered the New World around that time. And the foods – potatoes, tomatoes, bananas, maize, cacao, sunflower, and squash - that were taken back by explorers to the Old World changed Europe, their culture, and their economy forever.


7 New World Foods That Changed Europe Forever

There’s much debate whether Christopher Columbus really discovered America in 1492. Historians think there may have been other explorers before Columbus, others think the actual date wasn’t October 12 but rather October 21. At any rate, he gets the credit in many of the history books for his discovery. Even if he didn’t actually discover America, it may be safe to say that Spanish or European explorers discovered the New World around that time. And the foods – potatoes, tomatoes, bananas, maize, cacao, sunflower, and squash - that were taken back by explorers to the Old World changed Europe, their culture, and their economy forever.


7 New World Foods That Changed Europe Forever

There’s much debate whether Christopher Columbus really discovered America in 1492. Historians think there may have been other explorers before Columbus, others think the actual date wasn’t October 12 but rather October 21. At any rate, he gets the credit in many of the history books for his discovery. Even if he didn’t actually discover America, it may be safe to say that Spanish or European explorers discovered the New World around that time. And the foods – potatoes, tomatoes, bananas, maize, cacao, sunflower, and squash - that were taken back by explorers to the Old World changed Europe, their culture, and their economy forever.


7 New World Foods That Changed Europe Forever

There’s much debate whether Christopher Columbus really discovered America in 1492. Historians think there may have been other explorers before Columbus, others think the actual date wasn’t October 12 but rather October 21. At any rate, he gets the credit in many of the history books for his discovery. Even if he didn’t actually discover America, it may be safe to say that Spanish or European explorers discovered the New World around that time. And the foods – potatoes, tomatoes, bananas, maize, cacao, sunflower, and squash - that were taken back by explorers to the Old World changed Europe, their culture, and their economy forever.


7 New World Foods That Changed Europe Forever

There’s much debate whether Christopher Columbus really discovered America in 1492. Historians think there may have been other explorers before Columbus, others think the actual date wasn’t October 12 but rather October 21. At any rate, he gets the credit in many of the history books for his discovery. Even if he didn’t actually discover America, it may be safe to say that Spanish or European explorers discovered the New World around that time. And the foods – potatoes, tomatoes, bananas, maize, cacao, sunflower, and squash - that were taken back by explorers to the Old World changed Europe, their culture, and their economy forever.


7 New World Foods That Changed Europe Forever

There’s much debate whether Christopher Columbus really discovered America in 1492. Historians think there may have been other explorers before Columbus, others think the actual date wasn’t October 12 but rather October 21. At any rate, he gets the credit in many of the history books for his discovery. Even if he didn’t actually discover America, it may be safe to say that Spanish or European explorers discovered the New World around that time. And the foods – potatoes, tomatoes, bananas, maize, cacao, sunflower, and squash - that were taken back by explorers to the Old World changed Europe, their culture, and their economy forever.


7 New World Foods That Changed Europe Forever

There’s much debate whether Christopher Columbus really discovered America in 1492. Historians think there may have been other explorers before Columbus, others think the actual date wasn’t October 12 but rather October 21. At any rate, he gets the credit in many of the history books for his discovery. Even if he didn’t actually discover America, it may be safe to say that Spanish or European explorers discovered the New World around that time. And the foods – potatoes, tomatoes, bananas, maize, cacao, sunflower, and squash - that were taken back by explorers to the Old World changed Europe, their culture, and their economy forever.


7 New World Foods That Changed Europe Forever

There’s much debate whether Christopher Columbus really discovered America in 1492. Historians think there may have been other explorers before Columbus, others think the actual date wasn’t October 12 but rather October 21. At any rate, he gets the credit in many of the history books for his discovery. Even if he didn’t actually discover America, it may be safe to say that Spanish or European explorers discovered the New World around that time. And the foods – potatoes, tomatoes, bananas, maize, cacao, sunflower, and squash - that were taken back by explorers to the Old World changed Europe, their culture, and their economy forever.


7 New World Foods That Changed Europe Forever

There’s much debate whether Christopher Columbus really discovered America in 1492. Historians think there may have been other explorers before Columbus, others think the actual date wasn’t October 12 but rather October 21. At any rate, he gets the credit in many of the history books for his discovery. Even if he didn’t actually discover America, it may be safe to say that Spanish or European explorers discovered the New World around that time. And the foods – potatoes, tomatoes, bananas, maize, cacao, sunflower, and squash - that were taken back by explorers to the Old World changed Europe, their culture, and their economy forever.


7 New World Foods That Changed Europe Forever

There’s much debate whether Christopher Columbus really discovered America in 1492. Historians think there may have been other explorers before Columbus, others think the actual date wasn’t October 12 but rather October 21. At any rate, he gets the credit in many of the history books for his discovery. Even if he didn’t actually discover America, it may be safe to say that Spanish or European explorers discovered the New World around that time. And the foods – potatoes, tomatoes, bananas, maize, cacao, sunflower, and squash - that were taken back by explorers to the Old World changed Europe, their culture, and their economy forever.