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More than 110 Restaurants Join Dine Out for Heroes on Nov. 5

More than 110 Restaurants Join Dine Out for Heroes on Nov. 5



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Make a reservation at any of these restaurants and help support the long-term rehabilitation and care of injured veterans

More than 110 Restaurants Join ‘Dine Out for Heroes’ Fundraiser

On Wednesday, November 5, the inaugural Dine Out for Heroes event will take place in New York. The restaurant-based community movement is a new partnership for the Bob Woodruff Foundation, and will take place on the same day as the eighth annual Stand Up for Heroes fundraiser.

ABC News Journalist Bob Woodruff co-founded the foundation with his family after being critically injured while on assignment in Iraq.

Daniel Boulud, Andrew Carmellini, Jeffrey Lefcourt, Drew Nieporent, Simon Oren, Eric Ripert and Jeff Zalaznick, with Bob Grimes and Lockhart Steele have joined Dine for Heroes, among other prominent New York City restaurateurs.

More than 110 restaurants in New York City will participate on November 5, and will donate $1 to the Bob Woodruff Foundation for every patron that evening.

Participating restaurants include The Lamb’s Club, Le Bernardin, Lincoln Center Kitchen, Aureole, Betony, Nobu New York, Carbone, Blue Smoke, Charlie Palmer Steak, Wallsé, and dozens more. Find the full list of participating restaurants online, and make a reservation that will benefit the BWF.

“We’ve always been so proud of Stand Up for Heroes, and I am looking forward to the inaugural year of Dine Out for Heroes,” said Woodruff. “We have seen what can happen when a movement of generosity inspires thousands more to act, and we know the New York community will come together to salute our injured service members and their families yet again.”

For the latest food and drink updates, visit our Food News page.

Karen Lo is an associate editor at The Daily Meal. Follow her on Twitter @appleplexy.


NCAA reveals COVID-19 contingency plans for hoops tourneys

(AP) — Turns out the top four teams left out of March Madness won’t have their bubbles burst quite yet.

Under a contingency plan released Thursday by the Division I basketball committees, those four at-large teams that don’t make the original field in the men’s and women’s NCAA tournaments will be placed in order and serve as the replacement teams should any conference with multiple bids have a school that is unable to participate due to COVID-19 issues.

If the tournament begins without any withdrawals, the four would still be eligible to compete in the NIT.

The contingency plan only applies to the short period between the announcement of the brackets — March 14 for men and March 15 for women — and the start of games later that week. Once a tournament begins, any team whose opponent is forced to withdraw would automatically advance to the next round.

If there are COVID-19 issues with a qualifying school leading up to the NCAA Tournament selection, conferences get to designate a replacement team and it will be seeded in the bracket based upon its own body of work.

Single-bid conferences likewise can choose their replacement provided the team has gone seven days without a positive test.

Due to the pandemic, the entire men’s tournament will take place in Indianapolis and the surrounding area beginning with First Four games March 18 at Mackey Arena in West Lafayette and Assembly Hall in Bloomington. The Final Four will take place at Lucas Oil Stadium with the championship game scheduled for April 5.

The women’s tournament, which begins with first-round games March 21, will take place in San Antonio and neighboring cities of Austin and San Marcos. The Final Four is set for the Alamodome with the title game April 4.

The basketball committees formulated their contingency plan based on four core tenets: once the bracket is released, it will not be changed or reseeded it will attempt to ensure a full field before the tournament with no replacement teams once play begins every participating conference should have at least one team in the field and the replacement teams should be the best teams considered for an at-large that still remain.

Many of the same rules were used by the Division I competition and oversight committee to create a similar plan for winter championships such as wrestling and gymnastics. The plan also covers men’s and women’s cross country and men’s water polo, which are fall sports but whose champions will be decided in March.

Coronavirus links

  • Indiana State Department of Health coronavirus information(includes phone number to state hotline)
  • Sign up for COVID-19 vaccinations in Indiana
  • WISH-TV coronavirus coverage
  • WISH-TV’s “Gr8 Comeback”
  • Original Indiana Back on Track plan
  • Revised Stage 3 of Indiana Back on Track plan(May 12-June 13)
  • Revised Stage 4 of Indiana Back on Track plan(June 12-July 3)
  • Governor’s order, July 1: Stage 4.5 of Indiana Back on Track plan
  • Governor’s order, Sept. 24: Revised Stage 5 of Indiana Back on Track plan
  • Governor’s order, Jan. 28, 2021: 11th renewal of statewide emergency
  • Governor’s order, Feb. 25, 2021: 12th renewal of statewide emergency
  • Indianapolis government’s COVID-19 Community Resources page
  • Gleaners Food Bank distribution sites in Indianapolis area, south central Indiana
  • Second Harvest of East Central Indiana “tailgate” food distribution sites
  • Food Finders distribution sites in west and north central Indiana
  • Coronavirus COVID-19 global cases map from John Hopkins University
  • CDC’s coronavirus page
  • Marion County Public Health Department coronavirus information
  • U.S. Small Business Administration’s Economic Injury Disaster Loan program
  • Indiana PPE Directory(for businesses, nonprofits and schools only)

Indiana coronavirus timeline

With information from the Indiana Department of Health through March 4, 2021, this timeline reflects updated tallies of deaths and positive tests prior to that date.


NCAA reveals COVID-19 contingency plans for hoops tourneys

(AP) — Turns out the top four teams left out of March Madness won’t have their bubbles burst quite yet.

Under a contingency plan released Thursday by the Division I basketball committees, those four at-large teams that don’t make the original field in the men’s and women’s NCAA tournaments will be placed in order and serve as the replacement teams should any conference with multiple bids have a school that is unable to participate due to COVID-19 issues.

If the tournament begins without any withdrawals, the four would still be eligible to compete in the NIT.

The contingency plan only applies to the short period between the announcement of the brackets — March 14 for men and March 15 for women — and the start of games later that week. Once a tournament begins, any team whose opponent is forced to withdraw would automatically advance to the next round.

If there are COVID-19 issues with a qualifying school leading up to the NCAA Tournament selection, conferences get to designate a replacement team and it will be seeded in the bracket based upon its own body of work.

Single-bid conferences likewise can choose their replacement provided the team has gone seven days without a positive test.

Due to the pandemic, the entire men’s tournament will take place in Indianapolis and the surrounding area beginning with First Four games March 18 at Mackey Arena in West Lafayette and Assembly Hall in Bloomington. The Final Four will take place at Lucas Oil Stadium with the championship game scheduled for April 5.

The women’s tournament, which begins with first-round games March 21, will take place in San Antonio and neighboring cities of Austin and San Marcos. The Final Four is set for the Alamodome with the title game April 4.

The basketball committees formulated their contingency plan based on four core tenets: once the bracket is released, it will not be changed or reseeded it will attempt to ensure a full field before the tournament with no replacement teams once play begins every participating conference should have at least one team in the field and the replacement teams should be the best teams considered for an at-large that still remain.

Many of the same rules were used by the Division I competition and oversight committee to create a similar plan for winter championships such as wrestling and gymnastics. The plan also covers men’s and women’s cross country and men’s water polo, which are fall sports but whose champions will be decided in March.

Coronavirus links

  • Indiana State Department of Health coronavirus information(includes phone number to state hotline)
  • Sign up for COVID-19 vaccinations in Indiana
  • WISH-TV coronavirus coverage
  • WISH-TV’s “Gr8 Comeback”
  • Original Indiana Back on Track plan
  • Revised Stage 3 of Indiana Back on Track plan(May 12-June 13)
  • Revised Stage 4 of Indiana Back on Track plan(June 12-July 3)
  • Governor’s order, July 1: Stage 4.5 of Indiana Back on Track plan
  • Governor’s order, Sept. 24: Revised Stage 5 of Indiana Back on Track plan
  • Governor’s order, Jan. 28, 2021: 11th renewal of statewide emergency
  • Governor’s order, Feb. 25, 2021: 12th renewal of statewide emergency
  • Indianapolis government’s COVID-19 Community Resources page
  • Gleaners Food Bank distribution sites in Indianapolis area, south central Indiana
  • Second Harvest of East Central Indiana “tailgate” food distribution sites
  • Food Finders distribution sites in west and north central Indiana
  • Coronavirus COVID-19 global cases map from John Hopkins University
  • CDC’s coronavirus page
  • Marion County Public Health Department coronavirus information
  • U.S. Small Business Administration’s Economic Injury Disaster Loan program
  • Indiana PPE Directory(for businesses, nonprofits and schools only)

Indiana coronavirus timeline

With information from the Indiana Department of Health through March 4, 2021, this timeline reflects updated tallies of deaths and positive tests prior to that date.


NCAA reveals COVID-19 contingency plans for hoops tourneys

(AP) — Turns out the top four teams left out of March Madness won’t have their bubbles burst quite yet.

Under a contingency plan released Thursday by the Division I basketball committees, those four at-large teams that don’t make the original field in the men’s and women’s NCAA tournaments will be placed in order and serve as the replacement teams should any conference with multiple bids have a school that is unable to participate due to COVID-19 issues.

If the tournament begins without any withdrawals, the four would still be eligible to compete in the NIT.

The contingency plan only applies to the short period between the announcement of the brackets — March 14 for men and March 15 for women — and the start of games later that week. Once a tournament begins, any team whose opponent is forced to withdraw would automatically advance to the next round.

If there are COVID-19 issues with a qualifying school leading up to the NCAA Tournament selection, conferences get to designate a replacement team and it will be seeded in the bracket based upon its own body of work.

Single-bid conferences likewise can choose their replacement provided the team has gone seven days without a positive test.

Due to the pandemic, the entire men’s tournament will take place in Indianapolis and the surrounding area beginning with First Four games March 18 at Mackey Arena in West Lafayette and Assembly Hall in Bloomington. The Final Four will take place at Lucas Oil Stadium with the championship game scheduled for April 5.

The women’s tournament, which begins with first-round games March 21, will take place in San Antonio and neighboring cities of Austin and San Marcos. The Final Four is set for the Alamodome with the title game April 4.

The basketball committees formulated their contingency plan based on four core tenets: once the bracket is released, it will not be changed or reseeded it will attempt to ensure a full field before the tournament with no replacement teams once play begins every participating conference should have at least one team in the field and the replacement teams should be the best teams considered for an at-large that still remain.

Many of the same rules were used by the Division I competition and oversight committee to create a similar plan for winter championships such as wrestling and gymnastics. The plan also covers men’s and women’s cross country and men’s water polo, which are fall sports but whose champions will be decided in March.

Coronavirus links

  • Indiana State Department of Health coronavirus information(includes phone number to state hotline)
  • Sign up for COVID-19 vaccinations in Indiana
  • WISH-TV coronavirus coverage
  • WISH-TV’s “Gr8 Comeback”
  • Original Indiana Back on Track plan
  • Revised Stage 3 of Indiana Back on Track plan(May 12-June 13)
  • Revised Stage 4 of Indiana Back on Track plan(June 12-July 3)
  • Governor’s order, July 1: Stage 4.5 of Indiana Back on Track plan
  • Governor’s order, Sept. 24: Revised Stage 5 of Indiana Back on Track plan
  • Governor’s order, Jan. 28, 2021: 11th renewal of statewide emergency
  • Governor’s order, Feb. 25, 2021: 12th renewal of statewide emergency
  • Indianapolis government’s COVID-19 Community Resources page
  • Gleaners Food Bank distribution sites in Indianapolis area, south central Indiana
  • Second Harvest of East Central Indiana “tailgate” food distribution sites
  • Food Finders distribution sites in west and north central Indiana
  • Coronavirus COVID-19 global cases map from John Hopkins University
  • CDC’s coronavirus page
  • Marion County Public Health Department coronavirus information
  • U.S. Small Business Administration’s Economic Injury Disaster Loan program
  • Indiana PPE Directory(for businesses, nonprofits and schools only)

Indiana coronavirus timeline

With information from the Indiana Department of Health through March 4, 2021, this timeline reflects updated tallies of deaths and positive tests prior to that date.


NCAA reveals COVID-19 contingency plans for hoops tourneys

(AP) — Turns out the top four teams left out of March Madness won’t have their bubbles burst quite yet.

Under a contingency plan released Thursday by the Division I basketball committees, those four at-large teams that don’t make the original field in the men’s and women’s NCAA tournaments will be placed in order and serve as the replacement teams should any conference with multiple bids have a school that is unable to participate due to COVID-19 issues.

If the tournament begins without any withdrawals, the four would still be eligible to compete in the NIT.

The contingency plan only applies to the short period between the announcement of the brackets — March 14 for men and March 15 for women — and the start of games later that week. Once a tournament begins, any team whose opponent is forced to withdraw would automatically advance to the next round.

If there are COVID-19 issues with a qualifying school leading up to the NCAA Tournament selection, conferences get to designate a replacement team and it will be seeded in the bracket based upon its own body of work.

Single-bid conferences likewise can choose their replacement provided the team has gone seven days without a positive test.

Due to the pandemic, the entire men’s tournament will take place in Indianapolis and the surrounding area beginning with First Four games March 18 at Mackey Arena in West Lafayette and Assembly Hall in Bloomington. The Final Four will take place at Lucas Oil Stadium with the championship game scheduled for April 5.

The women’s tournament, which begins with first-round games March 21, will take place in San Antonio and neighboring cities of Austin and San Marcos. The Final Four is set for the Alamodome with the title game April 4.

The basketball committees formulated their contingency plan based on four core tenets: once the bracket is released, it will not be changed or reseeded it will attempt to ensure a full field before the tournament with no replacement teams once play begins every participating conference should have at least one team in the field and the replacement teams should be the best teams considered for an at-large that still remain.

Many of the same rules were used by the Division I competition and oversight committee to create a similar plan for winter championships such as wrestling and gymnastics. The plan also covers men’s and women’s cross country and men’s water polo, which are fall sports but whose champions will be decided in March.

Coronavirus links

  • Indiana State Department of Health coronavirus information(includes phone number to state hotline)
  • Sign up for COVID-19 vaccinations in Indiana
  • WISH-TV coronavirus coverage
  • WISH-TV’s “Gr8 Comeback”
  • Original Indiana Back on Track plan
  • Revised Stage 3 of Indiana Back on Track plan(May 12-June 13)
  • Revised Stage 4 of Indiana Back on Track plan(June 12-July 3)
  • Governor’s order, July 1: Stage 4.5 of Indiana Back on Track plan
  • Governor’s order, Sept. 24: Revised Stage 5 of Indiana Back on Track plan
  • Governor’s order, Jan. 28, 2021: 11th renewal of statewide emergency
  • Governor’s order, Feb. 25, 2021: 12th renewal of statewide emergency
  • Indianapolis government’s COVID-19 Community Resources page
  • Gleaners Food Bank distribution sites in Indianapolis area, south central Indiana
  • Second Harvest of East Central Indiana “tailgate” food distribution sites
  • Food Finders distribution sites in west and north central Indiana
  • Coronavirus COVID-19 global cases map from John Hopkins University
  • CDC’s coronavirus page
  • Marion County Public Health Department coronavirus information
  • U.S. Small Business Administration’s Economic Injury Disaster Loan program
  • Indiana PPE Directory(for businesses, nonprofits and schools only)

Indiana coronavirus timeline

With information from the Indiana Department of Health through March 4, 2021, this timeline reflects updated tallies of deaths and positive tests prior to that date.


NCAA reveals COVID-19 contingency plans for hoops tourneys

(AP) — Turns out the top four teams left out of March Madness won’t have their bubbles burst quite yet.

Under a contingency plan released Thursday by the Division I basketball committees, those four at-large teams that don’t make the original field in the men’s and women’s NCAA tournaments will be placed in order and serve as the replacement teams should any conference with multiple bids have a school that is unable to participate due to COVID-19 issues.

If the tournament begins without any withdrawals, the four would still be eligible to compete in the NIT.

The contingency plan only applies to the short period between the announcement of the brackets — March 14 for men and March 15 for women — and the start of games later that week. Once a tournament begins, any team whose opponent is forced to withdraw would automatically advance to the next round.

If there are COVID-19 issues with a qualifying school leading up to the NCAA Tournament selection, conferences get to designate a replacement team and it will be seeded in the bracket based upon its own body of work.

Single-bid conferences likewise can choose their replacement provided the team has gone seven days without a positive test.

Due to the pandemic, the entire men’s tournament will take place in Indianapolis and the surrounding area beginning with First Four games March 18 at Mackey Arena in West Lafayette and Assembly Hall in Bloomington. The Final Four will take place at Lucas Oil Stadium with the championship game scheduled for April 5.

The women’s tournament, which begins with first-round games March 21, will take place in San Antonio and neighboring cities of Austin and San Marcos. The Final Four is set for the Alamodome with the title game April 4.

The basketball committees formulated their contingency plan based on four core tenets: once the bracket is released, it will not be changed or reseeded it will attempt to ensure a full field before the tournament with no replacement teams once play begins every participating conference should have at least one team in the field and the replacement teams should be the best teams considered for an at-large that still remain.

Many of the same rules were used by the Division I competition and oversight committee to create a similar plan for winter championships such as wrestling and gymnastics. The plan also covers men’s and women’s cross country and men’s water polo, which are fall sports but whose champions will be decided in March.

Coronavirus links

  • Indiana State Department of Health coronavirus information(includes phone number to state hotline)
  • Sign up for COVID-19 vaccinations in Indiana
  • WISH-TV coronavirus coverage
  • WISH-TV’s “Gr8 Comeback”
  • Original Indiana Back on Track plan
  • Revised Stage 3 of Indiana Back on Track plan(May 12-June 13)
  • Revised Stage 4 of Indiana Back on Track plan(June 12-July 3)
  • Governor’s order, July 1: Stage 4.5 of Indiana Back on Track plan
  • Governor’s order, Sept. 24: Revised Stage 5 of Indiana Back on Track plan
  • Governor’s order, Jan. 28, 2021: 11th renewal of statewide emergency
  • Governor’s order, Feb. 25, 2021: 12th renewal of statewide emergency
  • Indianapolis government’s COVID-19 Community Resources page
  • Gleaners Food Bank distribution sites in Indianapolis area, south central Indiana
  • Second Harvest of East Central Indiana “tailgate” food distribution sites
  • Food Finders distribution sites in west and north central Indiana
  • Coronavirus COVID-19 global cases map from John Hopkins University
  • CDC’s coronavirus page
  • Marion County Public Health Department coronavirus information
  • U.S. Small Business Administration’s Economic Injury Disaster Loan program
  • Indiana PPE Directory(for businesses, nonprofits and schools only)

Indiana coronavirus timeline

With information from the Indiana Department of Health through March 4, 2021, this timeline reflects updated tallies of deaths and positive tests prior to that date.


NCAA reveals COVID-19 contingency plans for hoops tourneys

(AP) — Turns out the top four teams left out of March Madness won’t have their bubbles burst quite yet.

Under a contingency plan released Thursday by the Division I basketball committees, those four at-large teams that don’t make the original field in the men’s and women’s NCAA tournaments will be placed in order and serve as the replacement teams should any conference with multiple bids have a school that is unable to participate due to COVID-19 issues.

If the tournament begins without any withdrawals, the four would still be eligible to compete in the NIT.

The contingency plan only applies to the short period between the announcement of the brackets — March 14 for men and March 15 for women — and the start of games later that week. Once a tournament begins, any team whose opponent is forced to withdraw would automatically advance to the next round.

If there are COVID-19 issues with a qualifying school leading up to the NCAA Tournament selection, conferences get to designate a replacement team and it will be seeded in the bracket based upon its own body of work.

Single-bid conferences likewise can choose their replacement provided the team has gone seven days without a positive test.

Due to the pandemic, the entire men’s tournament will take place in Indianapolis and the surrounding area beginning with First Four games March 18 at Mackey Arena in West Lafayette and Assembly Hall in Bloomington. The Final Four will take place at Lucas Oil Stadium with the championship game scheduled for April 5.

The women’s tournament, which begins with first-round games March 21, will take place in San Antonio and neighboring cities of Austin and San Marcos. The Final Four is set for the Alamodome with the title game April 4.

The basketball committees formulated their contingency plan based on four core tenets: once the bracket is released, it will not be changed or reseeded it will attempt to ensure a full field before the tournament with no replacement teams once play begins every participating conference should have at least one team in the field and the replacement teams should be the best teams considered for an at-large that still remain.

Many of the same rules were used by the Division I competition and oversight committee to create a similar plan for winter championships such as wrestling and gymnastics. The plan also covers men’s and women’s cross country and men’s water polo, which are fall sports but whose champions will be decided in March.

Coronavirus links

  • Indiana State Department of Health coronavirus information(includes phone number to state hotline)
  • Sign up for COVID-19 vaccinations in Indiana
  • WISH-TV coronavirus coverage
  • WISH-TV’s “Gr8 Comeback”
  • Original Indiana Back on Track plan
  • Revised Stage 3 of Indiana Back on Track plan(May 12-June 13)
  • Revised Stage 4 of Indiana Back on Track plan(June 12-July 3)
  • Governor’s order, July 1: Stage 4.5 of Indiana Back on Track plan
  • Governor’s order, Sept. 24: Revised Stage 5 of Indiana Back on Track plan
  • Governor’s order, Jan. 28, 2021: 11th renewal of statewide emergency
  • Governor’s order, Feb. 25, 2021: 12th renewal of statewide emergency
  • Indianapolis government’s COVID-19 Community Resources page
  • Gleaners Food Bank distribution sites in Indianapolis area, south central Indiana
  • Second Harvest of East Central Indiana “tailgate” food distribution sites
  • Food Finders distribution sites in west and north central Indiana
  • Coronavirus COVID-19 global cases map from John Hopkins University
  • CDC’s coronavirus page
  • Marion County Public Health Department coronavirus information
  • U.S. Small Business Administration’s Economic Injury Disaster Loan program
  • Indiana PPE Directory(for businesses, nonprofits and schools only)

Indiana coronavirus timeline

With information from the Indiana Department of Health through March 4, 2021, this timeline reflects updated tallies of deaths and positive tests prior to that date.


NCAA reveals COVID-19 contingency plans for hoops tourneys

(AP) — Turns out the top four teams left out of March Madness won’t have their bubbles burst quite yet.

Under a contingency plan released Thursday by the Division I basketball committees, those four at-large teams that don’t make the original field in the men’s and women’s NCAA tournaments will be placed in order and serve as the replacement teams should any conference with multiple bids have a school that is unable to participate due to COVID-19 issues.

If the tournament begins without any withdrawals, the four would still be eligible to compete in the NIT.

The contingency plan only applies to the short period between the announcement of the brackets — March 14 for men and March 15 for women — and the start of games later that week. Once a tournament begins, any team whose opponent is forced to withdraw would automatically advance to the next round.

If there are COVID-19 issues with a qualifying school leading up to the NCAA Tournament selection, conferences get to designate a replacement team and it will be seeded in the bracket based upon its own body of work.

Single-bid conferences likewise can choose their replacement provided the team has gone seven days without a positive test.

Due to the pandemic, the entire men’s tournament will take place in Indianapolis and the surrounding area beginning with First Four games March 18 at Mackey Arena in West Lafayette and Assembly Hall in Bloomington. The Final Four will take place at Lucas Oil Stadium with the championship game scheduled for April 5.

The women’s tournament, which begins with first-round games March 21, will take place in San Antonio and neighboring cities of Austin and San Marcos. The Final Four is set for the Alamodome with the title game April 4.

The basketball committees formulated their contingency plan based on four core tenets: once the bracket is released, it will not be changed or reseeded it will attempt to ensure a full field before the tournament with no replacement teams once play begins every participating conference should have at least one team in the field and the replacement teams should be the best teams considered for an at-large that still remain.

Many of the same rules were used by the Division I competition and oversight committee to create a similar plan for winter championships such as wrestling and gymnastics. The plan also covers men’s and women’s cross country and men’s water polo, which are fall sports but whose champions will be decided in March.

Coronavirus links

  • Indiana State Department of Health coronavirus information(includes phone number to state hotline)
  • Sign up for COVID-19 vaccinations in Indiana
  • WISH-TV coronavirus coverage
  • WISH-TV’s “Gr8 Comeback”
  • Original Indiana Back on Track plan
  • Revised Stage 3 of Indiana Back on Track plan(May 12-June 13)
  • Revised Stage 4 of Indiana Back on Track plan(June 12-July 3)
  • Governor’s order, July 1: Stage 4.5 of Indiana Back on Track plan
  • Governor’s order, Sept. 24: Revised Stage 5 of Indiana Back on Track plan
  • Governor’s order, Jan. 28, 2021: 11th renewal of statewide emergency
  • Governor’s order, Feb. 25, 2021: 12th renewal of statewide emergency
  • Indianapolis government’s COVID-19 Community Resources page
  • Gleaners Food Bank distribution sites in Indianapolis area, south central Indiana
  • Second Harvest of East Central Indiana “tailgate” food distribution sites
  • Food Finders distribution sites in west and north central Indiana
  • Coronavirus COVID-19 global cases map from John Hopkins University
  • CDC’s coronavirus page
  • Marion County Public Health Department coronavirus information
  • U.S. Small Business Administration’s Economic Injury Disaster Loan program
  • Indiana PPE Directory(for businesses, nonprofits and schools only)

Indiana coronavirus timeline

With information from the Indiana Department of Health through March 4, 2021, this timeline reflects updated tallies of deaths and positive tests prior to that date.


NCAA reveals COVID-19 contingency plans for hoops tourneys

(AP) — Turns out the top four teams left out of March Madness won’t have their bubbles burst quite yet.

Under a contingency plan released Thursday by the Division I basketball committees, those four at-large teams that don’t make the original field in the men’s and women’s NCAA tournaments will be placed in order and serve as the replacement teams should any conference with multiple bids have a school that is unable to participate due to COVID-19 issues.

If the tournament begins without any withdrawals, the four would still be eligible to compete in the NIT.

The contingency plan only applies to the short period between the announcement of the brackets — March 14 for men and March 15 for women — and the start of games later that week. Once a tournament begins, any team whose opponent is forced to withdraw would automatically advance to the next round.

If there are COVID-19 issues with a qualifying school leading up to the NCAA Tournament selection, conferences get to designate a replacement team and it will be seeded in the bracket based upon its own body of work.

Single-bid conferences likewise can choose their replacement provided the team has gone seven days without a positive test.

Due to the pandemic, the entire men’s tournament will take place in Indianapolis and the surrounding area beginning with First Four games March 18 at Mackey Arena in West Lafayette and Assembly Hall in Bloomington. The Final Four will take place at Lucas Oil Stadium with the championship game scheduled for April 5.

The women’s tournament, which begins with first-round games March 21, will take place in San Antonio and neighboring cities of Austin and San Marcos. The Final Four is set for the Alamodome with the title game April 4.

The basketball committees formulated their contingency plan based on four core tenets: once the bracket is released, it will not be changed or reseeded it will attempt to ensure a full field before the tournament with no replacement teams once play begins every participating conference should have at least one team in the field and the replacement teams should be the best teams considered for an at-large that still remain.

Many of the same rules were used by the Division I competition and oversight committee to create a similar plan for winter championships such as wrestling and gymnastics. The plan also covers men’s and women’s cross country and men’s water polo, which are fall sports but whose champions will be decided in March.

Coronavirus links

  • Indiana State Department of Health coronavirus information(includes phone number to state hotline)
  • Sign up for COVID-19 vaccinations in Indiana
  • WISH-TV coronavirus coverage
  • WISH-TV’s “Gr8 Comeback”
  • Original Indiana Back on Track plan
  • Revised Stage 3 of Indiana Back on Track plan(May 12-June 13)
  • Revised Stage 4 of Indiana Back on Track plan(June 12-July 3)
  • Governor’s order, July 1: Stage 4.5 of Indiana Back on Track plan
  • Governor’s order, Sept. 24: Revised Stage 5 of Indiana Back on Track plan
  • Governor’s order, Jan. 28, 2021: 11th renewal of statewide emergency
  • Governor’s order, Feb. 25, 2021: 12th renewal of statewide emergency
  • Indianapolis government’s COVID-19 Community Resources page
  • Gleaners Food Bank distribution sites in Indianapolis area, south central Indiana
  • Second Harvest of East Central Indiana “tailgate” food distribution sites
  • Food Finders distribution sites in west and north central Indiana
  • Coronavirus COVID-19 global cases map from John Hopkins University
  • CDC’s coronavirus page
  • Marion County Public Health Department coronavirus information
  • U.S. Small Business Administration’s Economic Injury Disaster Loan program
  • Indiana PPE Directory(for businesses, nonprofits and schools only)

Indiana coronavirus timeline

With information from the Indiana Department of Health through March 4, 2021, this timeline reflects updated tallies of deaths and positive tests prior to that date.


NCAA reveals COVID-19 contingency plans for hoops tourneys

(AP) — Turns out the top four teams left out of March Madness won’t have their bubbles burst quite yet.

Under a contingency plan released Thursday by the Division I basketball committees, those four at-large teams that don’t make the original field in the men’s and women’s NCAA tournaments will be placed in order and serve as the replacement teams should any conference with multiple bids have a school that is unable to participate due to COVID-19 issues.

If the tournament begins without any withdrawals, the four would still be eligible to compete in the NIT.

The contingency plan only applies to the short period between the announcement of the brackets — March 14 for men and March 15 for women — and the start of games later that week. Once a tournament begins, any team whose opponent is forced to withdraw would automatically advance to the next round.

If there are COVID-19 issues with a qualifying school leading up to the NCAA Tournament selection, conferences get to designate a replacement team and it will be seeded in the bracket based upon its own body of work.

Single-bid conferences likewise can choose their replacement provided the team has gone seven days without a positive test.

Due to the pandemic, the entire men’s tournament will take place in Indianapolis and the surrounding area beginning with First Four games March 18 at Mackey Arena in West Lafayette and Assembly Hall in Bloomington. The Final Four will take place at Lucas Oil Stadium with the championship game scheduled for April 5.

The women’s tournament, which begins with first-round games March 21, will take place in San Antonio and neighboring cities of Austin and San Marcos. The Final Four is set for the Alamodome with the title game April 4.

The basketball committees formulated their contingency plan based on four core tenets: once the bracket is released, it will not be changed or reseeded it will attempt to ensure a full field before the tournament with no replacement teams once play begins every participating conference should have at least one team in the field and the replacement teams should be the best teams considered for an at-large that still remain.

Many of the same rules were used by the Division I competition and oversight committee to create a similar plan for winter championships such as wrestling and gymnastics. The plan also covers men’s and women’s cross country and men’s water polo, which are fall sports but whose champions will be decided in March.

Coronavirus links

  • Indiana State Department of Health coronavirus information(includes phone number to state hotline)
  • Sign up for COVID-19 vaccinations in Indiana
  • WISH-TV coronavirus coverage
  • WISH-TV’s “Gr8 Comeback”
  • Original Indiana Back on Track plan
  • Revised Stage 3 of Indiana Back on Track plan(May 12-June 13)
  • Revised Stage 4 of Indiana Back on Track plan(June 12-July 3)
  • Governor’s order, July 1: Stage 4.5 of Indiana Back on Track plan
  • Governor’s order, Sept. 24: Revised Stage 5 of Indiana Back on Track plan
  • Governor’s order, Jan. 28, 2021: 11th renewal of statewide emergency
  • Governor’s order, Feb. 25, 2021: 12th renewal of statewide emergency
  • Indianapolis government’s COVID-19 Community Resources page
  • Gleaners Food Bank distribution sites in Indianapolis area, south central Indiana
  • Second Harvest of East Central Indiana “tailgate” food distribution sites
  • Food Finders distribution sites in west and north central Indiana
  • Coronavirus COVID-19 global cases map from John Hopkins University
  • CDC’s coronavirus page
  • Marion County Public Health Department coronavirus information
  • U.S. Small Business Administration’s Economic Injury Disaster Loan program
  • Indiana PPE Directory(for businesses, nonprofits and schools only)

Indiana coronavirus timeline

With information from the Indiana Department of Health through March 4, 2021, this timeline reflects updated tallies of deaths and positive tests prior to that date.


NCAA reveals COVID-19 contingency plans for hoops tourneys

(AP) — Turns out the top four teams left out of March Madness won’t have their bubbles burst quite yet.

Under a contingency plan released Thursday by the Division I basketball committees, those four at-large teams that don’t make the original field in the men’s and women’s NCAA tournaments will be placed in order and serve as the replacement teams should any conference with multiple bids have a school that is unable to participate due to COVID-19 issues.

If the tournament begins without any withdrawals, the four would still be eligible to compete in the NIT.

The contingency plan only applies to the short period between the announcement of the brackets — March 14 for men and March 15 for women — and the start of games later that week. Once a tournament begins, any team whose opponent is forced to withdraw would automatically advance to the next round.

If there are COVID-19 issues with a qualifying school leading up to the NCAA Tournament selection, conferences get to designate a replacement team and it will be seeded in the bracket based upon its own body of work.

Single-bid conferences likewise can choose their replacement provided the team has gone seven days without a positive test.

Due to the pandemic, the entire men’s tournament will take place in Indianapolis and the surrounding area beginning with First Four games March 18 at Mackey Arena in West Lafayette and Assembly Hall in Bloomington. The Final Four will take place at Lucas Oil Stadium with the championship game scheduled for April 5.

The women’s tournament, which begins with first-round games March 21, will take place in San Antonio and neighboring cities of Austin and San Marcos. The Final Four is set for the Alamodome with the title game April 4.

The basketball committees formulated their contingency plan based on four core tenets: once the bracket is released, it will not be changed or reseeded it will attempt to ensure a full field before the tournament with no replacement teams once play begins every participating conference should have at least one team in the field and the replacement teams should be the best teams considered for an at-large that still remain.

Many of the same rules were used by the Division I competition and oversight committee to create a similar plan for winter championships such as wrestling and gymnastics. The plan also covers men’s and women’s cross country and men’s water polo, which are fall sports but whose champions will be decided in March.

Coronavirus links

  • Indiana State Department of Health coronavirus information(includes phone number to state hotline)
  • Sign up for COVID-19 vaccinations in Indiana
  • WISH-TV coronavirus coverage
  • WISH-TV’s “Gr8 Comeback”
  • Original Indiana Back on Track plan
  • Revised Stage 3 of Indiana Back on Track plan(May 12-June 13)
  • Revised Stage 4 of Indiana Back on Track plan(June 12-July 3)
  • Governor’s order, July 1: Stage 4.5 of Indiana Back on Track plan
  • Governor’s order, Sept. 24: Revised Stage 5 of Indiana Back on Track plan
  • Governor’s order, Jan. 28, 2021: 11th renewal of statewide emergency
  • Governor’s order, Feb. 25, 2021: 12th renewal of statewide emergency
  • Indianapolis government’s COVID-19 Community Resources page
  • Gleaners Food Bank distribution sites in Indianapolis area, south central Indiana
  • Second Harvest of East Central Indiana “tailgate” food distribution sites
  • Food Finders distribution sites in west and north central Indiana
  • Coronavirus COVID-19 global cases map from John Hopkins University
  • CDC’s coronavirus page
  • Marion County Public Health Department coronavirus information
  • U.S. Small Business Administration’s Economic Injury Disaster Loan program
  • Indiana PPE Directory(for businesses, nonprofits and schools only)

Indiana coronavirus timeline

With information from the Indiana Department of Health through March 4, 2021, this timeline reflects updated tallies of deaths and positive tests prior to that date.