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Homemade Turkey Stock Recipe

Homemade Turkey Stock Recipe


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Get the most out of your Thanksgiving turkey by making a nutritious culinary basic — homemade turkey stock. The smell of simmering turkey stock reminds me of home; I love it almost as much as I like a simple turkey-noodle soup. Et voila! A delicious, filling yet light meal.

Ingredients

  • Carcass of one 15-18 pound turkey
  • 2 medium yellow onions, quartered
  • 4 celery ribs, cut in 2-inch chunks
  • 4 carrots, cut in 2-inch chunks
  • Water, to cover most of turkey
  • 6 parsley stems (optional)
  • 2 dried bay leaves
  • 8 black peppercorns

Tools:

  • Cheesecloth and 6-inch piece of butcher’s twine

Directions

Place turkey carcass in a large stockpot; don't even bother stripping off any meat that remains, as it will flavor the stock. Add the vegetables to the pot. Cover with water by about 1–inch. Wrap the parsley stems, bay leaves, and peppercorns together in cheesecloth and tie with butcher’s twine. Add to the stock pot.

Place the pot over medium-high heat and bring to a boil. Immediately lower to a simmer and cook, uncovered, for 3–4 hours. Check the stock every once in a while, making sure the bird is mostly covered with water and that it is gently simmering, so as to extract as many nutrients from the bones as possible. Skim off any fat or foam that arises to the surface.

Once the stock has cooked, remove the carcass and discard. Pour the stock through a fine mesh strainer and press on the vegetables gently to extract any remaining moisture. Skim off any remaining fat that rises to the surface if you are going to use immediately, or cool the stock down in the fridge overnight, if you have the space, to make skimming off any fat that easy — it rises to the surface and slightly solidifies. If you’re not going to use the stock, spoon into freezer-safe containers and store in freezer for later use.


Recipe Summary

  • 5 quarts water, or as needed
  • 1 turkey carcass
  • 1 ½ cups coarsely chopped onion
  • 3 stalks celery
  • ½ cup chopped carrot
  • 10 whole black peppercorns
  • 1 pinch dried thyme, or to taste
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 ½ pounds carrots, cut into 1-inch chunks
  • 2 onions, diced
  • 6 stalks celery, cut into 1/2-inch slices
  • 1 cup barley
  • ½ cup chopped mushrooms
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 teaspoon dried marjoram
  • ½ teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1 pinch dried thyme

Bring water and turkey carcass to a boil in a large pot add 1 1/2 cup chopped onion, 3 stalks celery, 1/2 cup chopped carrot, peppercorns, 1 pinch thyme, and 1 bay leaf. Simmer, skimming excess fat and foam from top of stock as needed, 2 to 2 1/2 hours. Add more water to stock as it evaporates. Remove carcass from stock and cool. Pull meat from bones and shred refrigerate until needed. Strain stock and return liquid to pot.

Mix 1 1/2 pounds carrots, 2 onions, 6 stalks celery, barley, mushrooms, 2 bay leaves, salt, marjoram, black pepper, and 1 pinch thyme into turkey stock and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer soup, stirring occasionally, until barley is fully cooked, 1 hour and 20 minutes. Add turkey meat to the soup and simmer for 10 more minutes. Remove bay leaves before serving.


Homemade Turkey Stock

The typical way to make turkey stock is to use the carcass of the bird after it has been carved up. This is a great use of the bones after a meal, and you can wrap and freeze them until you are ready to make stock. But to be able to immediately use your stock for a flavorful gravy, use a part of the bird that many people normally just throw away. Once your Thanksgiving turkey has thawed, you can remove the giblets and neck and make this turkey stock a day or two in advance - it can be stored in the refrigerator. Add the turkey pieces, onion, celery, carrot, bay leaf, peppercorns, and water to a large saucepan and let simmer. You can even personalize the flavor by adding your favorite herbs, such as rosemary sprigs. Once the mixture has cooled, chill until you are ready to use it. This turkey stock will even make a delicious and comforting broth to drink. Use this homemade turkey stock to make Old-Fashioned Turkey Gravy or Mushroom Gravy. You don&rsquot have to wait for Thanksgiving to make stock follow this method any time you roast a chicken. Flavor-filled homemade stock, whether it is turkey, chicken, or beef, is the secret ingredient in soups and stews, cornbread dressings, and even roasted vegetable dishes. Use turkey stock anytime your recipe calls for chicken stock.


Preparation

    1. Position rack in top third of oven and preheat to 450°F.
    2. Using heavy cleaver, chop wings into 2-inch pieces. (See Test-Kitchen Tips, below.) Spread wings in roasting pan and roast, turning with tongs after 20 minutes, until deeply browned, about 45 minutes.
    3. Meanwhile, in 6-quart stock pot over moderate heat, heat oil until hot but not smoking. Add onion, carrot, and celery and cook, stirring occasionally, until soft, about 10 minutes. Add wings and any pan juices and reduce heat to low.
    4. Straddle roasting pan across 2 burners on high heat and cook until browned bits are sizzling, about 1 minute. Add 2 cups cold water and bring to boil, scraping up browned bits with flat wooden spatula or spoon. Pour liquid into pot and add enough cold water to cover ingredients by 1 inch, about 14 cups.
    5. Raise heat to high and bring to boil, skimming foam from surface. Add parsley, thyme, peppercorns, and bay leaf. Reduce heat to low and simmer, uncovered, 3 hours, adding water as needed to keep wings covered.
    6. Pour stock through fine-mesh sieve into large bowl, discarding solids. If using immediately, let stand until yellow fat rises to surface, 1 to 2 minutes, then skim off and discard fat. If not using immediately, place bowl in larger bowl of iced water. Let stand, changing ice water as it warms, until stock is tepid, at least 30 minutes. Cover and refrigerate until chilled, then scrape off and discard fat. (Stock can be made ahead and refrigerated in airtight container up to 2 days or frozen up to 6 months. Reheat in saucepan over low heat before using for stuffing and turkey.)

    Homemade Turkey Stock

    An easy homemade turkey broth perfect for soups and stews.

    I like to use a large-size slow cooker for this but a large stock pot or soup kettle can be used instead. Just be sure to watch the water level if using anything other than a slow cooker to be sure that bones remain covered with liquid.

    The stock is flavored by whatever stuffing or aromatics have been placed inside the turkey during roasting. If I'm in a hurry and don't want to deal with stuffing, I like to use some aromatics loosely placed inside of a raw turkey that has been rinsed out and patted dry with a clean towel. Coat the inside with Kosher salt, coarsely ground black pepper and ground cinnamon (or use a couple cinnamon sticks) then loosely place some quartered onions, chunks of sweet raw carrots, celery cut into 4 inch pieces, leek, and a red apple or two that has been quartered and cored into both the front breast cavity and the main body cavity of the turkey. Roast however you prefer. I like to preheat my oven to 500 degrees F. and put the turkey in a roasting pan on the lowest rack. Make a tent out of aluminum foil to put over the breast portion only. Roast for 30 minutes at 500 degrees. Reduce heat to 350 degrees and continue roasting, basting every 30 minutes until meat thermometer registers 161 degrees F. Turn off oven and let turkey sit until temperature reaches 180 degrees F. (Turkey will continue to cook even with oven turned off.) This makes a beautifully browned,moist and tender turkey with lovely pan drippings to use for this stock recipe.
    An easy homemade turkey broth perfect for soups and stews.

    I like to use a large-size slow cooker for this but a large stock pot or soup kettle can be used instead. Just be sure to watch the water level if using anything other than a slow cooker to be sure that bones remain covered with liquid.

    The stock is flavored by whatever stuffing or aromatics have been placed inside the turkey during roasting. If I'm in a hurry and don't want to deal with stuffing, I like to use some aromatics loosely placed inside of a raw turkey that has been rinsed out and patted dry with a clean towel. Coat the inside with Kosher salt, coarsely ground black pepper and ground cinnamon (or use a couple cinnamon sticks) then loosely place some quartered onions, chunks of sweet raw carrots, celery cut into 4 inch pieces, leek, and a red apple or two that has been quartered and cored into both the front breast cavity and the main body cavity of the turkey. Roast however you prefer. I like to preheat my oven to 500 degrees F. and put the turkey in a roasting pan on the lowest rack. Make a tent out of aluminum foil to put over the breast portion only. Roast for 30 minutes at 500 degrees. Reduce heat to 350 degrees and continue roasting, basting every 30 minutes until meat thermometer registers 161 degrees F. Turn off oven and let turkey sit until temperature reaches 180 degrees F. (Turkey will continue to cook even with oven turned off.) This makes a beautifully browned,moist and tender turkey with lovely pan drippings to use for this stock recipe.


    Homemade Turkey Stock Recipe

    My favorite thing to do the morning after Thanksgiving is to make homemade turkey stock from the turkey carcass. It is so easy to do and so delicious!

    Homemade turkey stock can be used in any application that you would normally use store bought stock. Of course, my favorite use of homemade stock is for making homemade Turkey Noodle Soup.

    The turkey stock can be used for a delicious soup or frozen for future use. I love a good homemade turkey soup and after the heavy Thanksgiving meal, it is just what my family needs. Be sure and refrigerate your turkey carcass after Thanksgiving until you are ready to make your stock.

    For this recipe instructions have been provided to cook turkey stock on the Stove top, Slow Cooker or Instant Pot Electric Pressure Cooker.

    For more great Low Fat Recipes, Low Calorie Recipes, Low Carbohydrate Recipes, and Diabetic Recipes, check out my Diet Recipe Index. Also check out my Nutritional Chart for fat grams, fiber grams, carbohydrate grams, and calories for all your favorite foods.

    • 1 leftover Turkey Carcass*
    • 10 to 12 cups cold water**
    • 1/2 cup carrot slices
    • 1 celery rib, cut into 1-inch pieces
    • 1/2 large onion, cut into chunks
    • 2 to 3 cloves garlic
    • 1 small whole chile pepper, dried (optional)

    In a large soup pot or Dutch oven, place turkey carcass (take the remains of the turkey after it has been carved and break it into pieces so it will fit in your pot cover with cold water by at least 1-inch). Add carrots, celery, onion, garlic, and red pepper (optional) to the soup pot. Add any other vegetables that you like, if desired.

    Cover pot and slowly bring to a simmer. As soon as you start to see boiling occur, immediatly reduce heat to low and skim off any scum on surface. Scum is the filmy layer of extraneous or impure matter that forms on or rises to the surface of a liquid or body of water. Cover pot and let slowly simmer approximately 3 hours.

    TIP: The key to a good stock is to bring the water to a boil just once at the beginning and then lower heat and cook at just barely a simmer for the remainder of the cooking time, as long slow cooking is best to extract all the subtle flavors. Do not let the stock reach a rolling boil!

    After cooking, remove from heat and discard all the turkey bones, meat, and vegetables (since your have cooked the mixture for a long time, there is no nutritional value left) . Strain the remaining liquid to remove smaller particles in the stock (pour the liquid through a fine mesh sieve placed over a large pot) .

    Place strained stock into shallow containers and refrigerate immediately. Refrigerate soup stock overnight and skim any congealed fat from the surface in the morning. The juice will gel up after being refrigerated, but will dissolve when stock is reheated later. This is because of the natural gelatin in the turkey bones .

    The stock will last for about a week in the fridge. You can freeze the cooled stock and it should maintain taste and quality for about 4 to 6 months.

    You now have the most wonderful low-fat turkey stock to use in making a delicious turkey soup or to freeze for later use.

    How to keep homemade turkey stock from getting cloudy:

    Skimming the scum that comes to the surface during the first 30 minutes of simmering and not letting it boil seems to help prevent clouding. The rule is - Skim early and skim often.

    Always simmer your stock and do not let it boil. Not boiling also leads to a richer tasting stock. Furious bubbling breaks up particles and causes clouding also. Simmer for approximately 3 hours total. I also think that simmering the stock too long contributes to making it cloudy.

    Refrigerate stock overnight or until all the fat raises to the top. Then remove the fat.

    There is also the old egg white trick (I have never tried it). Add unbeaten egg whites to the stock and let it simmer slowly, so that the cloudy particles stick to the egg and you can strain it out.

    Place turkey carcass and vegetables in your slow cooker, add enough cold water to cover the ingredients. Turn heat on low, cover, and let cook approximately 10 to 12 hours (this time can vary).

    Once the stock is finished cooking, let it cool in the refrigerator. Skim off the fat if needed. Remove the carcass or bones. Strain the broth well.

    Once the cooked turkey has cooled, pick off the turkey meat from the bones and set aside. Remove the skin and eat or discard. You save some of the turkey meat to make a lovely Homemade Turkey Noodle Soup and save the rest of the turkey for another meal.

    Take a strainer basket or steamer rack and insert into the inner pot. Place the chopped vegetables,herbs and seasonings into the basket or strainer. Next layer the turkey bones and carcass over the top of the vegetables. Try to compact the bones close together.

    Pour cold water over the top of the vegetables and bones until the bones are just barely covered. Adjust the amount of water added to make sure the inner pot is no more than 2/3 full or it may have trouble coming to pressure. Note: the trick to making a good stock is to not add too much water. you only need just enough to cover the bones. If too much water is added, then the stock may not gel up after cooling. All the good nutrients are in the gelatin! If you run into that issue, then you may need to let your stock simmer on the stove uncovered until the contents cook down more.

    Place the lid on the Instant Pot and close to seal. Next, make sure the pressure valve is closed to the sealing position. Press the Manual button, with a high-pressure setting. Adjust the cooking time for 120 minutes. When the cooking time has finished, allow to Natural Pressure Release until you see the pressure pin drop down. (This may take 20-25 minutes since there is a lot of liquid in the pot.)

    Place silicon oven mitts on your hands to protect from the steam and heat. Lift out the colander or steamer basket and discard the turkey bones and vegetables. Next, pour the stock through a strainer into another large heat-proof bowl. You can repeat this step until the stock is nice and clear.

    Let the stock cool down. As the stock is cooling you can skim off visible fat floating to the top and discard.

    Once the stock has cooled down enough( about 2-3 hours) cover and refrigerate until ready to use.

    The turkey stock can be refrigerated up to 3 days in advance of using. If not planning to use the turkey stock within 3 days, place in the freezer until ready to use. Whether the stock has been refrigerated until cold or stored in the freezer, there will be a thin layer of fat that has congealed on the top. Remove that by scraping it off with a spoon before you cook with the stock. Discard the congealed fat but be careful not to scrape off any clear gelatin. I usually refrigerate my turkey stock and skim off the fat before using in my soup making.

    * Strip the turkey carcass of any large usable pieces of meat set turkey meat aside and refrigerate until ready to use in your soup. Do not add the giblets.

    ** Enough cold water to cover all the ingredients in the pot by at least one (1) inch.

    Storing Turkey Stock:

    Turkey stock can be refrigerated up to 3 days in advance of using. If not planning to use the turkey stock within 3 days, place in the freezer until ready to use. Whether the stock has been refrigerated until cold or stored in the freezer, there will be a thin layer of fat that has congealed on the top. Remove fat layer by scraping it off with a spoon before you cook with the stock. Discard the congealed fat but be careful not to scrape off any clear gelatin. I usually refrigerate my turkey stock and skim off the fat before using in my soup making.

    How To Prevent Turkey Stock From Getting Cloudy:


    Question:

    I basically do the same thing as your turkey soup recipe but my stock always comes out cloudy and congealed after it sits. This year I used only the wings, drumsticks, and thighs and an onion. I’ve strained it and cooled it and skimmed off fat on top. L ast year the same thing happened. It tastes ok but doesn’t look too appetizing after it is stored in the fridge. – Dawn (11/29/98)

    Answer:
    I also just finished making my turkey stock. If I try to hurry the process, that is when I have problems of clouding.

    Skimming the scum that comes to the surface during the first 30 minutes of simmering and not letting it boil seems to help prevent clouding. The rule is: Skim early and skim often. Once your stock starts to boil, turn the heat down to medium low to get it down to a simmer for the rest of the cooking time. Do not let it reach a rolling boil. Simmering will lead to a richer tasting stock. Furious bubbling breaks up particles and causes clouding also. Simmer for approximately 3 hours total. I also think that simmering the stock too long contributes to making it cloudy.

    Refrigerate stock overnight or until all the fat raises to the top. Then remove the fat.

    Follow up:
    Thank you for responding so quickly. Two years in a row I’ve tried making stock and it always becomes cloudy. I thought I followed the recipe exactly but I guess I didn’t. I let it come to a rolling boil. That has to be the reason. My girlfriend made hers last night while I was there and hers came out clear but she let it simmer for about 2 hours without it ever boiling.

    My Nanna told me about the egg white trick (didn’t try it either) and one using an ice cube. The ice cube helped skimming the fat quickly but didn’t help the cloudiness. Thanks again and Happy Holidays! – Dawn


    Homemade Turkey Stock Recipe

    I love making a delicious Homemade Turkey Stock Recipe. It fills the house with gorgeous aromas as it cooks away slowly. You are then left with a lovely broth that you can make your own homemade soup with or other sauces or recipes. The turkey carcass is just something you would otherwise throw away. Why not put it to good use. Making a turkey stock is easy and rewarding.

    Easy simple ingredients go into making a great stock. I don&rsquot bother peeling all the onions, or the shallots or garlic. I actually just throw a whole head of garlic in plus a few additional cloves. Speaking of cloves but the spice variety, I have always studded the onion that I don&rsquot peel with cloves. It gives depth of flavor but no real heavy clove taste at all. I love it and makes the house even more aromatic while cooking.

    All loaded into the pot. I leave some of the meat on the carcass for more flavor in your broth. Leftover turkey though is already diced and waiting for me in the fridge when I want to make soup though.

    To get a lovely clear broth I always strain the broth through a few layers of cheese cloth. It gets rid of any tiny bits that you would rather not have in your soup or sauces.

    Clear and full of flavor is the broth from this recipe. A real winner to make your homemade soups or other recipes. I have also done a similar recipe in my stock pot using a chicken carcass for chicken broth but it would work here very well too. Here is the recipe for Overnight Slow Cooker Chicken Stock. I would also like to share with you my lovely Easy Light Turkey Noodle Soup. So healthy and wonderful. Pure comfort food in my mind.


    Easy Turkey Stock

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    Thanksgiving dinner is only the beginning of the story. After the pie’s been served, and you’ve raided the turkey for sandwiches, there’s the bird’s carcass to deal with. Instead of throwing it out, make turkey stock. It can be used in any recipe calling for chicken stock, and freezes beautifully for up to 3 months.

    Here are 3 recipes that taste noticeably more amazing with homemade turkey stock: Jerk Turkey Chili, Creamed Turkey, and Turkey Mulligatawny Soup.

    Instructions

    1. 1 Break up carcass with a meat mallet or cleaver so it fits in a stockpot (at least 15 quarts), then add remaining ingredients. Add enough cold water to cover the bones by 2 inches and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce heat to low and simmer, skimming occasionally, until turkey flavor comes through in the stock, about 2 to 3 hours.
    2. 2 Strain through a fine mesh strainer into large heatproof containers. Let cool to room temperature, then refrigerate or freeze.

    Recommended from Chowhound

    In this Thanksgiving edition of our You’re Doing It All Wrong video series, chef and TV host Michael Chiarello extols the benefits of a brined turkey. Avoid some things (have you ever heard of a blivit?) and embrace others (the bird fits perfectly inside a cooler). If you follow the approach Michael outlines here, he guarantees you one of the juiciest turkey dinners you've ever had. See our Turkey Brining Guide for more info and options (dry brining is great if you're short on space), and our Ultimate Guide to Thanksgiving for everything else you need to know.


    Recipe Summary

    • 1 tablespoon olive oil
    • 1 large onion
    • 2 stalks celery, including some leaves
    • 2 large carrots
    • 1 bunch green onions, chopped
    • 8 cloves garlic, minced
    • 8 sprigs fresh parsley
    • 6 sprigs fresh thyme
    • 2 bay leaves
    • 1 teaspoon salt
    • 2 quarts water

    Chop scrubbed vegetables into 1-inch chunks. Remember, the greater the surface area, the more quickly vegetables will yield their flavor.

    Heat oil in a soup pot. Add onion, celery, carrots, scallions, garlic, parsley, thyme, and bay leaves. Cook over high heat for 5 to 10 minutes, stirring frequently.

    Add salt and water and bring to a boil. Lower heat and simmer, uncovered, for 30 minutes. Strain. Discard vegetables.

    Other ingredients to consider: mushrooms, eggplant, asparagus (butt ends), corn cobs, fennel (stalks and trimmings), bell peppers, pea pods, chard (stems and leaves), celery root parings, marjoram (stems and leaves), basil, potato parings . . . Get the idea?



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